Bowels vs Colon - What's the difference?

bowels | colon |


As a noun bowels

is .

As a proper noun colon is

.

bowels

English

Noun

(head)
  • (plural only) The deepest or innermost part.
  • down in the bowels of the Earth
  • (plural only) The concept or quality that defines something at its very core.
  • the project's bowels
  • (plural only) The intestines.
  • Synonyms

    * (deepest or innermost part) centre/center, core, heart * (intestines) entrails, guts, intestines

    Anagrams

    * *

    colon

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • (grammar) The punctuation mark " ".
  • * 2005 , William Strunk Jr. and E.B. White, The Elements of Style , Penguin Press, page 15:
  • A colon tells the reader that what follows is closely related to the preceding clause.
  • (rare) The triangular colon (especially in context of not being able to type the actual triangular colon).
  • (rhetoric) A rhetorical figure consisting of a clause which is grammatically, but not logically, complete.
  • See also

    * * (punctuation)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • (anatomy) Part of the large intestine; the final segment of the digestive system, after (distal to) the ileum and before (proximal to) the anus
  • Synonyms
    * (final segment of digestive system) large bowel
    Holonyms
    * (segment of digestive system) large intestine
    Derived terms
    * colectomy * colic * colitis * colonic * colonitis * colostomy * colonic irrigation

    See also

    * bowel * large intestine * rectum

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) colon.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A husbandman.
  • A European colonial settler, especially in a French colony.
  • * 1977 , (Alistair Horne), A Savage War of Peace , New York Review Books 2006, p. 28:
  • The reaction of the European colons , a mixture of shock and fear, was to demand further draconian measures and to suspend any suggestion of new reforms.

    Anagrams

    * ----