Lolly vs Colly - What's the difference?

lolly | colly |


As a proper noun lolly

is .

As an adjective colly is

(british|dialect) black as coal.

As a verb colly is

(archaic) to make black, as with coal.

As a noun colly is

(british|dialect) soot.

lolly

English

Noun

(lollies)
  • A piece of hard candy on a stick; a lollipop.
  • * 2004 , , Feast: Food that Celebrates Life , unnumbered page,
  • Trim the lolly' sticks, so that you have a stem of about 3–4cm to stick into the cake, and then plunge the sticks of the foreshortened ' lollies into the cake so that the ghoulish faces leer out from their black-frosted graveyard.
  • (UK, slang, uncountable) Money.
  • (Australia, New Zealand) Any confection made from sugar, or high in sugar content; a sweet, a piece of candy.
  • * 1924 , Frank George Carpenter, Australia, New Zealand and Some Islands of the South Seas , page 36,
  • Leaving the Domain, I walked back to the hotel, noticing the queer signs by the way. One was “Lollies for Sale.” It was over the door of a confectioner?s store where all sorts of candies were displayed.
  • * 2002 , R.I.C. Publications, Primary Science , page 52,
  • Organise the students into small groups. Send a letter home to the parents stating that the science lesson will involve students eating a small amount of lollies'. Check which students are allowed to eat ' lollies . Students with diabetes will only be able to observe or they could bring their own ‘special’ sweets from home.
  • * 2008 , , unnumbered page,
  • He looked straight into Frau Diller?s spectacled eyes and said, ‘Mixed lollies , please.’
    Frau Diller smiled.‘Here,’ she said, tossing a single lolly onto the counter. ‘Mix it yourself.’

    Synonyms

    (confection) * bonbon * candy (US) * confection * sweet

    Derived terms

    * ice lolly * lolly scramble

    colly

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • (British, dialect) black as coal
  • -

    Verb

  • (archaic) to make black, as with coal
  • * Ben Jonson
  • Thou hast not collied thy face enough.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Brief as the lighting in the collied night.
  • *
  • Noun

    (collies)
  • (British, dialect) Soot.
  • (Burton)
  • (British, dialect) A blackbird
  • (dated)
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1833 , author=William Craig Brownlee , title=The Whigs of Scotland: Or, The Last of the Stuarts, vol. 2 , page=30 citation , passage=Can a Whig lick the feet o' the tyrant wha usurps oor Lord's throne, and accept o' ane indulgence frae him, hurled to him as a bane to a colly dog , binding himself to think as he thinks, and to preach as he wulls it; and to flatter tyranny in church and state, to win a paltry boon!}}
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1847 , author=Thomas Miller , title=The Boy's Country Book , page=80 citation , passage=On the moors and mountains of Scotland the shepherd sends out his colly with the sheep, far out of his sight, conscious that when he sets out to look for them, they will be found herded safely together.}}
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1861 , author=Francis Galton , title=Vacation Tourists and Notes of Travel in 1860 citation , page=139 , passage=Colly dog's early training is a rude one, but I think that it is mutual, and that the shepherd picks up a good deal of dog during the process. , }}

    See also

    * collywobbles