Dollied vs Collied - What's the difference?

dollied | collied |


As verbs the difference between dollied and collied

is that dollied is (dolly) while collied is (colly).

dollied

English

Verb

(head)
  • (dolly)

  • dolly

    English

    Noun

    (dollies)
  • A contrivance, turning on a vertical axis by a handle or winch, and giving a circular motion to the ore to be washed; a stirrer.
  • A tool with an indented head for shaping the head of a rivet.
  • (Knight)
  • In pile driving, a block interposed between the head of the pile and the ram of the driver.
  • A small truck with a single wide roller used for moving heavy beams, columns, etc., in bridge building.
  • A compact, narrow-gauge locomotive used for moving construction trains, switching, etc.
  • (film) A specialized piece of film equipment resembling a little cart on which a camera is mounted.
  • (children, colloquial) A child's name for a doll.
  • (cricket) A ball hit by a batsman such that it goes gently to a fielder for a simple catch.
  • See also

    * (specialized piece of film equipment) tracking shot

    Verb

  • (cricket) To hit a dolly.
  • To move an object using a dolly.
  • Anagrams

    *

    collied

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (colly)
  • Anagrams

    *

    colly

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • (British, dialect) black as coal
  • -

    Verb

  • (archaic) to make black, as with coal
  • * Ben Jonson
  • Thou hast not collied thy face enough.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Brief as the lighting in the collied night.
  • *
  • Noun

    (collies)
  • (British, dialect) Soot.
  • (Burton)
  • (British, dialect) A blackbird
  • (dated)
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1833 , author=William Craig Brownlee , title=The Whigs of Scotland: Or, The Last of the Stuarts, vol. 2 , page=30 citation , passage=Can a Whig lick the feet o' the tyrant wha usurps oor Lord's throne, and accept o' ane indulgence frae him, hurled to him as a bane to a colly dog , binding himself to think as he thinks, and to preach as he wulls it; and to flatter tyranny in church and state, to win a paltry boon!}}
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1847 , author=Thomas Miller , title=The Boy's Country Book , page=80 citation , passage=On the moors and mountains of Scotland the shepherd sends out his colly with the sheep, far out of his sight, conscious that when he sets out to look for them, they will be found herded safely together.}}
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1861 , author=Francis Galton , title=Vacation Tourists and Notes of Travel in 1860 citation , page=139 , passage=Colly dog's early training is a rude one, but I think that it is mutual, and that the shepherd picks up a good deal of dog during the process. , }}

    See also

    * collywobbles