Collided vs Bumped - What's the difference?

collided | bumped |


As verbs the difference between collided and bumped

is that collided is (collide) while bumped is (bump).

collided

English

Verb

(head)
  • (collide)

  • collide

    English

    Verb

    (collid)
  • To impact directly, especially if violent
  • When a body collides with another, then momentum is conserved.
  • * Tyndall
  • Across this space the attraction urges them. They collide , they recoil, they oscillate.
  • * Carlyle
  • No longer rocking and swaying, but clashing and colliding .
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2012 , date=June 2 , author= Phil McNulty , title=England 1-0 Belgium , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=And this friendly was not without its injury worries, with defender Gary Cahill substituted early on after a nasty, needless push by Dries Mertens that caused him to collide with goalkeeper Joe Hart, an incident that left the Chelsea defender requiring a precautionary X-ray at Wembley.}}
  • To come into conflict, or be incompatible
  • China collided with the modern world.

    Synonyms

    * clash

    bumped

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (bump)

  • bump

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A light blow or jolting collision.
  • The sound of such a collision.
  • A protuberance on a level surface.
  • A swelling on the skin caused by illness or injury.
  • * Shakespeare
  • It had upon its brow / A bump as big as a young cockerel's stone.
  • One of the protuberances on the cranium which, in phrenology, are associated with distinct faculties or affections of the mind.
  • the bump''' of veneration; the '''bump of acquisitiveness
  • (rowing) The point, in a race in which boats are spaced apart at the start, at which a boat begins to overtake the boat ahead.
  • The swollen abdomen of a pregnant woman.
  • (Internet) A post in an Internet forum thread made in order to raise the thread's profile by returning it to the top of the list of active threads.
  • A temporary increase in a quantity, as shown in a graph.
  • US presidential nominees get a post-convention bump in survey ratings.
  • (slang) A dose of a drug such as ketamine or cocaine, when snorted recreationally.
  • The noise made by the bittern; a boom.
  • A coarse cotton fabric.
  • A training match for a fighting dog.
  • Derived terms

    * bump and grind * bump in the road * bumpity * bumpy * fist bump * razor bump * speed bump * things that go bump in the night

    Verb

  • To knock against or run into with a jolt.
  • To move up or down by a step.
  • I bumped the font size up to make my document easier to read.
  • (Internet) To post in an Internet forum thread in order to raise the thread's profile by returning it to the top of the list of active threads.
  • (chemistry, of a superheated liquid) To suddenly boil, causing movement of the vessel and loss of liquid.
  • * 1916 , Albert Prescott Mathews, Physiological chemistry
  • Heat until the liquid bumps , then reduce the heat and continue the boiling for 1½ hours.
  • To move (a booked passenger) to a later flight because of earlier delays or cancellations.
  • * 2005 , Lois Jones, EasyJet: the story of Britain's biggest low-cost airline (page 192)
  • Easyjet said the compensation package for passengers bumped off flights was 'probably the most flawed piece of European legislation in recent years'...
  • To move the time of a scheduled event.
  • * 2010 , Nancy Conner, Matthew MacDonald, Office 2010: The Missing Manual , p. 332:
  • A colleague emails with news that her 4:30 meeting got bumped to 3:30.
  • (archaic) To make a loud, heavy, or hollow noise; to boom.
  • * Dryden
  • as a bittern bumps within a reed

    Derived terms

    * bump and grind * bump into * bump off * bump up * English 4chan slang ----