Conflate vs Collate - What's the difference?

conflate | collate |


As verbs the difference between conflate and collate

is that conflate is to bring (things) together and fuse (them) into a single entity while collate is to examine diverse documents et cetera to discover similarities and differences.

As an adjective conflate

is (biblical criticism) combining elements from multiple versions of the same text.

As a noun conflate

is (biblical criticism) a conflate text, one which conflates multiple version of a text together.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

conflate

English

Verb

(conflat)
  • To bring (things) together and fuse (them) into a single entity.
  • To mix together different elements.
  • To fail to properly distinguish or keep separate (things); to treat (them) as equivalent.
  • Synonyms

    * (to bring together) fuse, meld * (mix together) mix, blend, coalesce, commingle, flux, immix, merge

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (biblical criticism) Combining elements from multiple versions of the same text.
  • * 1999 , Emanuel Tov, The Greek and Hebrew Bible: Collected Essays on the Septuagint :
  • Why the redactor created this conflate version, despite its inconsistencies, is a matter of conjecture.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (biblical criticism) A conflate text, one which conflates multiple version of a text together.
  • References

    Anagrams

    * ----

    collate

    English

    Verb

    (collat)
  • To examine diverse documents et cetera to discover similarities and differences.
  • The young attorneys were set the task of collating the contract submitted by the other side with the previous copy.
  • * Coleridge
  • I must collate it, word by word, with the original Hebrew.
  • To assemble something in a logical sequence.
  • * 1922 , , Vintage Classics, paperback edition, page 101
  • Detest your own age. Build a better one. And to set that on foot read incredibly dull essays upon Marlowe to your friends. For which purpose one must collate editions in the British Museum.
  • To sort multiple copies of printed documents into sequences of individual page order, one sequence for each copy, especially before binding.
  • Collating was still necessary because they had to insert foldout sheets and index tabs into the documents.
  • (obsolete) To bestow or confer.
  • (Jeremy Taylor)
  • (Christianity) To admit a cleric to a benefice; to present and institute in a benefice, when the person presenting is both the patron and the ordinary; followed by to .