Gaudy vs Cocky - What's the difference?

gaudy | cocky |


As adjectives the difference between gaudy and cocky

is that gaudy is very showy or ornamented, now especially when excessive, or in a tasteless or vulgar manner while cocky is overly confident, arrogant and boastful.

As nouns the difference between gaudy and cocky

is that gaudy is one of the large beads in the rosary at which the paternoster is recited or gaudy can be a reunion held by one of the colleges of the university of oxford for alumni, normally held during the summer vacations while cocky is abbreviation of cockatoo; used when pretending to talk to such a bird, as in "hello cocky" .

gaudy

English

Etymology 1

Origin uncertain; perhaps from . A common claim that the word derives from , is not supported by evidence (the word was in use at least half a century before Gaudí was born).

Adjective

(er)
  • very showy or ornamented, now especially when excessive, or in a tasteless or vulgar manner
  • * Shakespeare
  • Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, / But not expressed in fancy; rich, not gaudy .
  • * 1813 , , Pride and Prejudice
  • The rooms were lofty and handsome, and their furniture suitable to the fortune of its proprietor; but Elizabeth saw, with admiration of his taste, that it was neither gaudy nor uselessly fine; with less of splendour, and more real elegance, than the furniture of Rosings.
  • * 1887 , Homer Greene, Burnham Breaker
  • A large gaudy , flowing cravat, and an ill-used silk hat, set well back on the wearer's head, completed this somewhat noticeable costume.
  • * 2005 , Thomas Hauser & Marilyn Cole Lownes, "How Bling-bling Took Over the Ring", The Observer , 9 January 2005
  • Gaudy jewellery might offend some people's sense of style. But former heavyweight champion and grilling-machine entrepreneur George Foreman is philosophical about today's craze for bling-bling.
  • (obsolete) gay; merry; festive
  • (Tennyson)
  • * Shakespeare
  • Let's have one other gaudy night.
  • * Twain
  • And then, there he was, slim and handsome, and dressed the gaudiest and prettiest you ever saw...
    Synonyms
    * (excessively showy) tawdry, flashy, garish, kitschy *
    Derived terms
    * gaudily * gaudy night

    Noun

    (gaudies)
  • One of the large beads in the rosary at which the paternoster is recited.
  • (Gower)

    Etymology 2

    From Latin gaudium "joy".

    Noun

    (gaudies)
  • A reunion held by one of the colleges of the University of Oxford for alumni, normally held during the summer vacations.
  • cocky

    English

    Etymology 1

    From .

    Noun

    (cockies)
  • Abbreviation of cockatoo; used when pretending to talk to such a bird, as in "hello cocky" .
  • * 2005 August 5, The World Today: Town seeks environmental accreditation , radio programme, transcript,
  • Visit the local store at Coles Bay and you?re greeted by a talking cocky called Jim.
  • (Australia, New Zealand, colloquial) A cockatoo farmer.
  • * 1907 , , Human Toll , Gutenberg Australia eBook #0607531,
  • ‘We camped one evening at Narrangidgery Creek, close b? a cocky ?s ?umstead.’
  • * 1946 , , My Career Goes Bung , Gutenberg Australia eBook #0900281,
  • Burrawong was one of the larger stations in which much of the good land of the district was locked. The cockies usually had to follow the main road, but since the drought the owners had opened one of their permanent water-holes so that the poorer settlers could cart water to their homesteads.
  • * 2001 November 19, Shelley Horton, Media Dimensions: Episode 15 , TV programme, transcript,
  • And stories in the bush may not seem relevant in the big smoke, but try telling that to a cocky .
  • * 2010 , Jackie French, A Waltz for Matilda , unnumbered page,
  • Now — well, Moura was scarcely Drinkwater, but it was more than just a cocky farm too.
  • (New Zealand, informal) A sheep farmer.
  • Usage notes
    * (farmer) In both Australia and New Zealand, forms such as sheep cocky'' (sheep farmer) and ''cow cocky'' (dairy farmer) exist. In New Zealand, ''cocky'' is often synonymous with ''sheep cocky , due to the relative importance of the industry.
    Synonyms
    * (bird) birdie * (farmer) crofter; see also farmer
    Derived terms
    (farmer) boss cocky, cocky's joy

    Etymology 2

    From .

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Overly confident, arrogant and boastful.
  • * 1881 November 29, Sir Ernest Mason Satow, Letter to William George Aston'', 2008, Sir Ernest Mason Satow, Ian Ruxton (editor), ''Sir Ernest Satow's Private Letters to W.G. Aston and F.V. Dickins: The Correspondence of a Pioneer Japanologist from 1870 to 1918 , page 66,
  • Hodges has made a great fool of himself, by getting gradually cockier' and ' cockier .
  • * 2008 , Gerard Thomas, Nightwarrior Chronicles: All Girls? Team , page 85,
  • The confidence that was temporarily humbled now returned with a cockier attitude.
  • * 2011 , Melanie Harvey, Indispensable Friendship & Death Collide , page 204,
  • You smiling your oh-so-perfect smile and me with the biggest, cockiest' grin on my face you can ever imagine. I would have been the ' cockiest man alive that night knowing you were going home with me.
    Synonyms
    * See also