Coal vs Collier - What's the difference?

coal | collier |


As nouns the difference between coal and collier

is that coal is (uncountable) a black rock formed from prehistoric plant remains, composed largely of carbon and burned as a fuel while collier is a person in the business or occupation of producing (digging or mining coal or making charcoal) or in its transporting or commerce.

As a verb coal

is to take on a supply of coal (usually of steam ships).

coal

English

(wikipedia coal)

Noun

(en-noun)
  • (uncountable) A black rock formed from prehistoric plant remains, composed largely of carbon and burned as a fuel.
  • (countable) A piece of coal used for burning. Note that in British English either of the following examples could be used, whereas the latter would be more common in American English.
  • Put some coals on the fire.
    Put some coal on the fire.
  • (countable) A type of coal, such as bituminous, anthracite, or lignite, and grades and varieties thereof.
  • (countable) A glowing or charred piece of coal, wood, or other solid fuel.
  • Just as the camp-fire died down to just coals , with no flames to burn the marshmallows, someone dumped a whole load of wood on, so I gave up and went to bed.
  • Charcoal
  • Hyponyms

    * anthracite, bitumin

    Derived terms

    * bituminous coal, soft coal * brown coal * channel coal * coal ball * coal bed * coal black * coalboy * coal gas * coal hole * coal oil * coal tar * coal tit * coalmine, coal mine * coals to Newcastle * hard coal (see: anthracite) * white coal

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To take on a supply of coal (usually of steam ships).
  • * 1890 , (Oscar Wilde), The Picture of Dorian Gray , ch. XVI:
  • The light shook and splintered in the puddles. A red glare came from an outward-bound steamer that was coaling .
  • To be converted to charcoal.
  • * 1957 , H.R. Schubert, History of the British Iron and Steel Industry , p. 18:
  • As a result, particles of wood and twigs insufficiently coaled are frequently found at the bottom of such pits.
  • To burn to charcoal; to char.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • Charcoal of roots, coaled into great pieces.
  • To mark or delineate with charcoal.
  • (Camden)
  • To supply with coal.
  • to coal a steamer

    Anagrams

    *

    collier

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A person in the business or occupation of producing (digging or mining coal or making charcoal) or in its transporting or commerce.
  • * 1957 , H.R. Schubert, History of the British Iron and Steel Industry , p. 224.
  • For this reason, the collier took constant care to keep the covering of earth in good order.
  • (nautical) A vessel carrying a bulk cargo of coal
  • A nickname used by the traveller community, referring to a non-traveller
  • References

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