Hank vs Clutter - What's the difference?

hank | clutter |


In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between hank and clutter

is that hank is (obsolete) hold; influence while clutter is (obsolete) clatter; confused noise.

As nouns the difference between hank and clutter

is that hank is a coil or loop of something, especially twine, yarn, or rope while clutter is a confused disordered jumble of things.

As verbs the difference between hank and clutter

is that hank is to form into hanks while clutter is to fill something with.

hank

English

Proper noun

(s)
  • .
  • (archaic) A diminutive of the given name Hankin (a medieval form of John).
  • clutter

    English

    Noun

    (-)
  • A confused disordered jumble of things.
  • * L'Estrange
  • He saw what a clutter there was with huge, overgrown pots, pans, and spits.
  • *{{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= William E. Conner
  • , title= An Acoustic Arms Race , volume=101, issue=3, page=206-7, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Nonetheless, some insect prey take advantage of clutter' by hiding in it. Earless ghost swift moths become “invisible” to echolocating bats by forming mating clusters close (less than half a meter) above vegetation and effectively blending into the ' clutter of echoes that the bat receives from the leaves and stems around them.}}
  • (obsolete) Clatter; confused noise.
  • (Jonathan Swift)
  • Background echos, from clouds etc., on a radar or sonar screen.
  • (countable) A group of cats;
  • * 2008 , John Robert Colombo, The Big Book of Canadian Ghost Stories , Introduction
  • Organizing ghost stories is like herding a clutter of cats: the phenomenon resists organization and classification.

    Derived terms

    * surface clutter * volume clutter

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To fill something with .
  • *{{quote-magazine, title=No hiding place
  • , date=2013-05-25, volume=407, issue=8837, page=74, magazine=(The Economist) citation , passage=In America alone, people spent $170 billion on “direct marketing”—junk mail of both the physical and electronic varieties—last year. Yet of those who received unsolicited adverts through the post, only 3% bought anything as a result. If the bumf arrived electronically, the take-up rate was 0.1%. And for online adverts the “conversion” into sales was a minuscule 0.01%. That means about $165 billion was spent not on drumming up business, but on annoying people, creating landfill and cluttering spam filters.}}
  • (obsolete) To clot or coagulate, like blood.
  • (Holland)
  • To make a confused noise; to bustle.
  • * Tennyson
  • It [the goose] cluttered here, it chuckled there.
    (Webster 1913)