Settle vs Close - What's the difference?

settle | close | Related terms |

Settle is a related term of close.


In archaic|lang=en terms the difference between settle and close

is that settle is (archaic) a seat of any kind while close is (archaic) concise; to the point.

In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between settle and close

is that settle is (obsolete) a place made lower than the rest; a wide step or platform lower than some other part while close is (obsolete) out of the way of observation; secluded; secret; hidden.

As verbs the difference between settle and close

is that settle is to place in a fixed or permanent condition; to make firm, steady, or stable; to establish; to fix; especially, to establish in life; to fix in business, in a home etc while close is (label) to remove a gap.

As nouns the difference between settle and close

is that settle is (archaic) a seat of any kind while close is an end or conclusion or close can be an enclosed field.

As an adjective close is

closed, shut.

settle

English

(Webster 1913)

Verb

(settl)
  • To place in a fixed or permanent condition; to make firm, steady, or stable; to establish; to fix; especially, to establish in life; to fix in business, in a home etc.
  • * And he settled his countenance steadfastly upon him,until he was ashamed. --2 Kings VIII. 11. (Rev. Ver.)
  • *
  • (transitive, obsolete, US) To establish in the pastoral office; to ordain or install as pastor or rector of a church, society, or parish.
  • To cause to be no longer in a disturbed condition; to quieten; to still; to calm; to compose.
  • * (George Chapman)
  • God settled then the huge whale-bearing lake.
  • * (John Bunyan)
  • Hoping that sleep might settle his brains.
  • To clear or purify (a liquid) of dregs and impurities by causing them to sink
  • To restore (ground, roads etc.) or bring to a smooth, dry, or passable condition
  • To cause to sink; to lower
  • To determine, as something which is exposed to doubt or question; to free from uncertainty
  • * (Jonathan Swift)
  • It will settle the wavering, and confirm the doubtful.
  • To pacify (a discussion, quarrel).
  • (archaic) To adjust (accounts); to liquidate; to balance.
  • (colloquial) To pay.
  • to settle a bill
  • To colonize; to move people to (a land or territory).
  • To become fixed, permanent or stationary; to establish one's self or itself
  • * (Francis Bacon)
  • The wind came about and settled in the west.
  • * (John Arbuthnot)
  • Chyleruns through all the intermediate colors until it settles in an intense red.
  • To fix one's residence; to establish a dwelling place or home.
  • To become married, or a householder.
  • * (Matthew Prior)
  • As people marry now and settle .
  • To be established in a profession or in employment.
  • To become firm, dry, and hard, like the ground after the effects of rain or frost have disappeared.
  • To become clear after being unclear or vague
  • * (Joseph Addison)
  • A government, on such occasions, is always thick before it settles .
  • To sink to the bottom of a body of liquid, for example dregs of a liquid, or the sediment of a reservoir.
  • To sink gradually to a lower level; to subside, for example the foundation of a house, etc.
  • To become calm; to stop being agitated
  • * (William Shakespeare)
  • Till the fury of his highness settle , Come not before him.
  • To adjust differences or accounts; to come to an agreement.
  • (obsolete) To make a jointure for a wife.
  • * (Samuel Garth)
  • He sighs with most success that settles well.

    Synonyms

    * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l)

    Antonyms

    * (to place in a fixed or permanent condition) remove * (l) * (l) * (l)

    Derived terms

    * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (archaic) A seat of any kind.
  • * Hampole
  • upon the settle of his majesty
  • A long bench, often with a high back and arms, with storage space underneath for linen.
  • (obsolete) A place made lower than the rest; a wide step or platform lower than some other part.
  • * Bible, Ezekiel xliii. 14
  • And from the bottom upon the ground, even to the lower settle , shall be two cubits, and the breadth one cubit.

    close

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) .

    Verb

    (clos)
  • (label) To remove a gap.
  • # To obstruct (an opening).
  • # To move so that an opening is closed.
  • #* (Lord Byron) (1788-1824)
  • What deep wounds ever closed without a scar?
  • #*
  • #*:If I close my eyes I can see Marie today as I saw her then. Round, rosy face, snub nose, dark hair piled up in a chignon.
  • # To make (e.g. a gap) smaller.
  • # To grapple; to engage in close combat.
  • #* (1796-1859)
  • They boldly closed in a hand-to-hand contest.
  • (label) To finish, to terminate.
  • # To put an end to; to conclude; to complete; to finish; to consummate.
  • #* (John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • One frugal supper did our studies close .
  • # To come to an end.
  • # (label) To make a sale.
  • # To make the final outs, usually three, of a game.
  • # To terminate an application, window, file or database connection, etc.
  • To come or gather around; to enclose; to encompass; to confine.
  • * Bible, (w) ii. 5
  • The depth closed me round about.
  • * (George Herbert) (1593-1633)
  • But now Thou dost Thyself immure and close / In some one corner of a feeble heart; / Where yet both Sinne and Satan, Thy old foes, / Do pinch and straiten Thee, and use much art / To gain Thy thirds' and little part.
  • (label) To have a vector sum of 0; that is, to form a closed polygon.
  • Synonyms
    * close off, close up, cover, shut, shut off * shut * (put an end to) end, finish, terminate, wind up, close down * narrow * (terminate a computer program) close out, exit
    Antonyms
    * open * open * (put an end to) begin, commence, initiate, start * extend, widen * (terminate a computer program) open, start
    Derived terms
    * autoclosing * case closed * close down * close in * close off * close one's eyes * close out * close ranks * close the door on * close the face * close up *

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An end or conclusion.
  • We owe them our thanks for bringing the project to a successful close .
  • * Macaulay
  • His long and troubled life was drawing to a close .
  • The manner of shutting; the union of parts; junction.
  • * Chapman
  • The doors of plank were; their close exquisite.
  • A grapple in wrestling.
  • (Francis Bacon)
  • (music) The conclusion of a strain of music; cadence.
  • * Dryden
  • At every close she made, the attending throng / Replied, and bore the burden of the song.
  • (music) A double bar marking the end.
  • Synonyms
    * (end) end, finale
    Antonyms
    * (end) beginning, start

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) clos, from (etyl) clausum, participle of (m).

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Closed, shut.
  • * 1526 , William Tyndale, trans. Bible , Matthew chapter 8:
  • There is nothinge so close , that shall not be openned, and nothinge so hyd that shall not be knowen.
  • * Dryden
  • From a close bower this dainty music flowed.
  • Narrow; confined.
  • a close''' alley; '''close quarters
  • * Charles Dickens
  • a close prison
  • At a little distance; near.
  • * , chapter=7
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=[…] St.?Bede's at this period of its history was perhaps the poorest and most miserable parish in the East End of London. Close -packed, crushed by the buttressed height of the railway viaduct, rendered airless by huge walls of factories, it at once banished lively interest from a stranger's mind and left only a dull oppression of the spirit.}}
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-01, volume=407, issue=8838, page=71, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= End of the peer show , passage=Finance is seldom romantic. But the idea of peer-to-peer lending comes close . This is an industry that brings together individual savers and lenders on online platforms. Those that want to borrow are matched with those that want to lend.}}
  • Intimate; well-loved.
  • # (legal) Of a corporation or other business entity, closely held.
  • Oppressive; without motion or ventilation; causing a feeling of lassitude.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • If the rooms be low-roofed, or full of windows and doors, the one maketh the air close , and the other maketh it exceeding unequal.
  • Hot, humid, with no wind.
  • (linguistics, phonetics, of a vowel) Articulated with the tongue body relatively close to the hard palate.
  • Strictly confined; carefully guarded.
  • a close prisoner
  • (obsolete) Out of the way of observation; secluded; secret; hidden.
  • * Bible, 1 Chron. xii. 1
  • He yet kept himself close because of Saul.
  • * Spenser
  • her close intent
  • Nearly equal; almost evenly balanced.
  • a close contest
  • Short.
  • to cut grass or hair close
  • (archaic) Dense; solid; compact.
  • * John Locke
  • The golden globe being put into a press, the water made itself way through the pores of that very close metal.
  • (archaic) Concise; to the point.
  • close reasoning
  • * Dryden
  • Where the original is close no version can reach it in the same compass.
  • (dated) Difficult to obtain.
  • Money is close .
    (Bartlett)
  • (dated) Parsimonious; stingy.
  • * Hawthorne
  • a crusty old fellow, as close as a vice
  • Adhering strictly to a standard or original; exact.
  • a close translation
    (John Locke)
  • Accurate; careful; precise; also, attentive; undeviating; strict.
  • The patient was kept under close observation.
    Synonyms
    * (at a little distance) close by, near, nearby * (intimate) intimate * muggy, oppressive * (articulated with the tongue body relatively close to the hard palate) high
    Antonyms
    * (at a little distance) distant, far, far away, far off, remote * (intimate) aloof, cool, distant * (articulated with the tongue body relatively close to the hard palate) open
    Derived terms
    * close call * closely * closeness * close shave * close-up * thisclose

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An enclosed field.
  • (British) A street that ends in a dead end.
  • (Scotland) A very narrow alley between two buildings, often overhung by one of the buildings above the ground floor.
  • (Scotland) The common staircase in a tenement.
  • A cathedral close.
  • * Macaulay
  • closes surrounded by the venerable abodes of deans and canons.
  • (legal) The interest which one may have in a piece of ground, even though it is not enclosed.
  • (Bouvier)
    Synonyms
    * (street) cul-de-sac

    Statistics

    *