Flock vs Clog - What's the difference?

flock | clog |


As nouns the difference between flock and clog

is that flock is a large number of birds, especially those gathered together for the purpose of migration or flock can be coarse tufts of wool or cotton used in bedding while clog is a type of shoe with an inflexible, often wooden sole sometimes with an open heel.

As verbs the difference between flock and clog

is that flock is to congregate in or head towards a place in large numbers or flock can be to coat a surface with dense fibers or particles while clog is to block or slow passage through (often with 'up' ).

flock

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) . More at (l).

Noun

(en noun)
  • A large number of birds, especially those gathered together for the purpose of migration.
  • A large number of animals, especially sheep or goats kept together.
  • Those served by a particular pastor or shepherd.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1995 , author=Green Key Books , title=God's Word to the Nations (John 10:16) citation , passage=I also have other sheep that are not from this pen. I must lead them. They, too, will respond to my voice. So they will be one flock with one shepherd. }}
  • * Tennyson
  • As half amazed, half frighted all his flock .
  • A large number of people.
  • * Bible, 2 Macc. xiv. 14
  • The heathen came to Nicanor by flocks .
    Synonyms
    * congregation, bunch, gaggle, horde, host, legion, litter, nest, rabble, swarm, throng, wake

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To congregate in or head towards a place in large numbers.
  • People flocked to the cinema to see the new film.
  • * Dryden
  • Friends daily flock .
  • (obsolete) To flock to; to crowd.
  • * 1609 , Taylor
  • Good fellows, trooping, flocked me so.
  • To treat a pool with chemicals to remove suspended particles.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Coarse tufts of wool or cotton used in bedding
  • A lock of wool or hair.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:I prythee, Tom, beat Cut's saddle, put a few flocks in the point [pommel].
  • Very fine sifted woollen refuse, especially that from shearing the nap of cloths, formerly used as a coating for wallpaper to give it a velvety or clothlike appearance; also, the dust of vegetable fibre used for a similar purpose.
  • *
  • *:There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger's weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock -paper on the walls.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To coat a surface with dense fibers or particles.
  • clog

    English

    Noun

    (en noun) (wikipedia clog)
  • A type of shoe with an inflexible, often wooden sole sometimes with an open heel.
  • Dutch people rarely wear clog s these days.
  • A blockage.
  • The plumber cleared the clog from the drain.
  • (UK, colloquial) A shoe of any type.
  • * 1987 , :
  • Withnail: I let him in this morning. He lost one of his clog s.
  • A weight, such as a log or block of wood, attached to a person or animal to hinder motion.
  • * Hudibras
  • As a dog by chance breaks loose, / And quits his clog .
  • * Tennyson
  • A clog of lead was round my feet.
  • That which hinders or impedes motion; an encumbrance, restraint, or impediment of any kind.
  • * Burke
  • All the ancient, honest, juridical principles and institutions of England are so many clogs to check and retard the headlong course of violence and oppression.

    Derived terms

    * clogs to clogs in three generations * pop one's clogs

    Verb

  • To block or slow passage through (often with 'up' ).
  • Hair is clogging the drainpipe.
    The roads are clogged up with traffic.
  • To encumber or load, especially with something that impedes motion; to hamper.
  • * Dryden
  • The wings of winds were clogged with ice and snow.
  • To burden; to trammel; to embarrass; to perplex.
  • * Addison
  • The commodities are clogged with impositions.
  • * Shakespeare
  • You'll rue the time / That clogs me with this answer.