Claver vs Cliver - What's the difference?

claver | cliver |


As a noun claver

is (uk|scotland|dialect) frivolous or nonsensical talk; prattle; chatter or claver can be .

As a verb claver

is to gossip or chit-chat.

As an adjective cliver is

(obsolete|or|dialectal) clever.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

claver

English

Etymology 1

Noun

  • (UK, Scotland, dialect) frivolous or nonsensical talk; prattle; chatter
  • * Thackeray
  • Emmy found herself entirely at a loss in the midst of their clavers .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • to gossip or chit-chat
  • Etymology 2

    Noun

    (-)
  • (Holland)

    Anagrams

    * * ----

    cliver

    English

    Adjective

  • (obsolete, or, dialectal) clever
  • * {{quote-book, year=1918, author=Harold Bindloss, title=The Buccaneer Farmer, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage=There's ways a cliver agent can run up a reckoning, and when you want Mireside I'll have to gan." "}}
  • * {{quote-book, year=1893, author=Robert Michael Ballantyne, title=The World of Ice, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage="Ah, but it's a cliver trick, no doubt of it."}}
  • * {{quote-book, year=1861, author=George Eliot, title=Silas Marner, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage=For I've often a deal inside me as'll never come out; and for what you talk o' your folks in your old country niver saying prayers by heart nor saying 'em out of a book, they must be wonderful cliver ; for if I didn't know "Our Father", and little bits o' good words as I can carry out o' church wi' me, I might down o' my knees every night, but nothing could I say."}}
  • * {{quote-book, year=1831, author=Edward Bulwer-Lytton, title=Eugene Aram, Complete, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage=Oh, they be cliver creturs, and they'll do what they likes with old Nick, when they gets there, for 'tis the old gentlemen they cozens the best; and then," continued the Corporal, waxing more and more loquacious, for his appetite in talking grew with that it fed on,--"then there be another set o' queer folks you'll see in Lunnon, Sir, that is, if you falls in with 'em,--hang all together, quite in a clink.}} ----