Gird vs Cling - What's the difference?

gird | cling |


In lang=en terms the difference between gird and cling

is that gird is to jeer while cling is to cause to dry up or wither.

As verbs the difference between gird and cling

is that gird is to bind with a flexible rope or cord or gird can be to jeer at while cling is (senseid)to hold very tightly, as to not fall off.

As nouns the difference between gird and cling

is that gird is a sarcastic remark while cling is fruit (especially peach) whose flesh adheres strongly to the pit.

gird

English

Etymology 1

(etyl) .

Verb

  • To bind with a flexible rope or cord.
  • The fasces were girt about with twine in bundles large.
  • To encircle with, or as if with a belt.
  • The lady girt herself with silver chain, from which she hung a golden shear.
    Our home is girt by sea... -
  • To prepare oneself for an action.
  • Etymology 2

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A sarcastic remark.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I thank thee for that gird , good Tranio.
  • A stroke with a rod or switch.
  • A severe spasm; a twinge; a pang.
  • * Tillotson
  • Conscience is freed from many fearful girds and twinges which the atheist feels.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To jeer at.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Being moved, he will not spare to gird the gods.
  • To jeer.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Men of all sorts take a pride to gird at me.

    cling

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Fruit (especially peach) whose flesh adheres strongly to the pit.
  • * 1908 , , Hostages to Momus :
  • Antelope steaks and fried liver to begin on, and venison cutlets with chili con carne and pineapple fritters, and then some sardines and mixed pickles; and top it off with a can of yellow clings and a bottle of beer.
  • adherence; attachment; devotion
  • * Milton
  • A more tenacious cling to worldly respects.

    Verb

  • (senseid)To hold very tightly, as to not fall off.
  • Seaweed clung to the anchor.
  • * Mrs. Hemans
  • And what hath life for thee / That thou shouldst cling to it thus?
  • To adhere to an object, without being affixed, in such a way as to follow its contours. Used especially of fabrics and films.
  • To cause to adhere to, especially by twining round or embracing.
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • I clung legs as close to his side as I could.
  • To cause to dry up or wither.
  • * Shakespeare
  • If thou speak'st false, / Upon the next tree shalt thou hang alive, / Till famine cling thee.
  • (figurative, with preposition to) to be fond of, to feel strongly about
  • Derived terms

    * cling film / clingfilm

    References

    * * * Notes: English irregular verbs