Perch vs Climb - What's the difference?

perch | climb |


As a proper noun perch

is .

As a verb climb is

to ascend; rise; to go up.

As a noun climb is

an act of climbing.

perch

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) perche, from (etyl) perca, from (etyl) .

Noun

(en-noun)
  • Any of the three species of spiny-finned freshwater fish in the genus Perca .
  • Any of the about 200 related species of fish in the taxonomic family Percidae.
  • Several similar species in the order Perciformes, such as the grouper.
  • Hyponyms
    * Balkhash perch, European perch, yellow perch * (fish in family Percidae) darter, pike-perch, zander * (fish in order Perciformes) bass
    Derived terms
    * (black perch) * (blue perch) * (grey perch) * (gray perch) * (red perch) * (red-bellied perch) * (perch pest) * (silver perch) * (stone perch) * (striped perch) * (white perch)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) perche, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • a rod, staff, or branch of a tree etc used as a roost by a bird
  • * Tennyson
  • Not making his high place the lawless perch / Of winged ambitions.
  • A pole connecting the fore gear and hind gear of a spring carriage; a reach.
  • a position that is secure and advantageous, especially one which is prominent or elevated
  • (dated) a linear measure of 5½ yards, equal to a rod, a pole or ¼ chain; the related square measure
  • a cubic measure of stonework equal to 16.6 × 1.5 × 1 feet
  • (textiles) a frame used to examine cloth
  • Derived terms
    * knock someone off his perch

    Verb

    (es)
  • To rest on (or as if on) a perch; to roost.
  • To stay in an elevated position.
  • To place something on (or as if on) a perch.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2012 , date=September 7 , author=Dominic Fifield , title=England start World Cup campaign with five-goal romp against Moldova , work=The Guardian citation , page= , passage=The most obvious beneficiary of the visitors' superiority was Frank Lampard. By the end of the night he was perched 13th in the list of England's most prolific goalscorers, having leapfrogged Sir Geoff Hurst to score his 24th and 25th international goals. No other player has managed more than the Chelsea midfielder's 11 in World Cup qualification ties, with this a display to roll back the years.}}
  • (transitive, intransitive, textiles) To inspect cloth using a .
  • climb

    English

    Verb

  • To ascend; rise; to go up.
  • Prices climbed steeply.
  • * Dryden
  • Black vapours climb aloft, and cloud the day.
  • To mount; to move upwards on.
  • They climbed the mountain.
    Climbing a tree
  • To scale; to get to the top of something.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2010, date=May 22, author=David Harrison
  • , title=American boy, 13, is youngest person to climb Everest , work=Daily Telegraph online citation , page= , passage=He is a curly-haired schoolboy barely in his teens, but 13-year-old Jordan Romero from California has become the youngest person to climb Mount Everest.}}
  • To move (especially up and down something) by gripping with the hands and using the feet.
  • * 1900 , (James Frazer), (The Golden Bough) Chapter 65
  • A priest clad in a white robe climbs the tree and with a golden sickle cuts the mistletoe, which is caught in a white cloth.
  • * 1900 , , ''(The Wonderful Wizard of Oz)
  • She thought she must have been mistaken at first, for none of the scarecrows in Kansas ever wink; but presently the figure nodded its head to her in a friendly way. Then she climbed down from the fence and walked up to it, while Toto ran around the pole and barked.
  • * 2008 , Tony Atkins, Dragonhawk - the Turning
  • Cutter and Bolan climbed around the furniture and piled into the back of the truck.
  • to practise the sport of climbing
  • to jump high
  • * {{quote-news, year=2010, date=December 28
  • , author=Paul Fletcher, title=Man City 4 - 0 Aston Villa, work=BBC citation , page= , passage=The defender climbed majestically at the near post to convert Johnson's corner. }}
  • * {{quote-news, year=2008, date=September 13
  • , title=Ospreys Glasgow Magners League, work=South Wales Evening Post citation , page= , passage=As the game moved towards injury time, the Ospreys forced a line-out which Jonathan Thomas climbed high to take.}}
  • * {{quote-news, year=2001, date=December 29, author=Derick Allsop
  • , title=Bolton's nine men hit back to steal a point, work=Daily Telegraph online citation , page= , passage=Four minutes of stoppage time were virtually up when Ricketts climbed to head in the equaliser from substitute Nicky Southall's centre.}}
  • To move to a higher position on the social ladder.
  • (botany) Of plants, to grow upwards by clinging to something.
  • Usage notes

    In the past, the forms clomb'' and ''clumb were encountered as simple past and past participle forms; these forms are now archaic or dialectical.

    Derived terms

    * climb down * climb down someone's throat * climb up * climb the ladder * climb the walls * climber * declimb * have a mountain to climb * unclimbed
    Synonyms
    (get to the top of) * scale

    Noun

    (wikipedia climb) (en noun)
  • An act of climbing.
  • * 2007 , Nigel Shepherd, Complete Guide to Rope Techniques
  • Make sure that you keep checking to see that everything remains safe throughout the climb .
  • The act of getting to somewhere more elevated.
  • * 2012 , July 15. Richard Williams in Guardian Unlimited, Tour de France 2012: Carpet tacks cannot force Bradley Wiggins off track
  • The Mur de Péguère is a savage little climb , its last four kilometres a narrow tunnel of trees and excited spectators urging on the straining riders.
  • * 1999 , B. Keith Jones, The Roomie Do Me Blues
  • I guess the room wasn't so bad, except for the climb to get there. The stairs were destined to be a serious health hazard.
  • An upwards struggle
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=1998 , date=September 30 , author=AP , title=Worst May Lie Ahead For Asia, Report Warns , work=Milwaukee Journal Sentinel citation , page= , passage=After a decade of prosperity, millions of Asians are likely to be pushed into poverty, and the climb out of poverty will stall for millions of others}}

    Derived terms

    * rate of climb