Climax vs Suspense - What's the difference?

climax | suspense |


As nouns the difference between climax and suspense

is that climax is the point of greatest intensity or force in an ascending series; a culmination while suspense is the condition of being suspended; cessation for a time.

As a verb climax

is to reach or bring to a climax.

As a adjective suspense is

(obsolete) held or lifted up; held or prevented from proceeding.

climax

English

Noun

(es)
  • The point of greatest intensity or force in an ascending series; a culmination
  • * 1949 , Bruce Kiskaddon, George R. Stewart,
  • The snowshoe-rabbits build up through the years until they reach a climax when the seem to be everywhere; then with dramatic suddenness their pestilence falls upon them.
  • The turning point in a plot or in dramatic action, especially one marking a change in the protagonist's affairs.
  • (ecosystem)(label) A stage of ecological development in which a community of organisms is stable and capable of perpetuating itself.
  • (slang) An orgasm.
  • (rhetoric) Ordering of terms in increasing order of importance or magnitude.
  • (rhetoric) Anadiplosis.
  • Synonyms

    * See also

    Coordinate terms

    * (order by increasing importance) catacosmesis

    Derived terms

    * climactic * climax community

    Verb

    (es)
  • To reach or bring to a climax
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2012 , date=May 31 , author=Tasha Robinson , title=Film: Review: Snow White And The Huntsman citation , page= , passage=Huntsman starts out with a vision of Theron that’s specific, unique, and weighted in character, but it trends throughout toward generic fantasy tropes and black-and-white morality, and climaxes in a thoroughly familiar face-off. }}
  • To orgasm; to reach orgasm
  • suspense

    Alternative forms

    * (l) (obsolete)

    Noun

    (-)
  • The condition of being suspended; cessation for a time.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • a cool suspense from pleasure and from pain
  • the pleasurable emotion of anticipation and excitement regarding the outcome or climax of a book, film etc.
  • The unpleasant emotion of anxiety or apprehension in an uncertain situation.
  • * Denham
  • Ten days the prophet in suspense remained.
  • (legal) A temporary cessation of one's right; suspension, as when the rent or other profits of land cease by unity of possession of land and rent.
  • Derived terms

    * suspenseful

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (obsolete) Held or lifted up; held or prevented from proceeding.
  • * Milton
  • [The great light of day] suspense in heaven.
  • (obsolete) Expressing, or proceeding from, suspense or doubt.
  • * Milton
  • Expectation held his look suspense .
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