Click vs Clickstream - What's the difference?

click | clickstream |


As nouns the difference between click and clickstream

is that click is a brief, sharp, not particularly loud, relatively high-pitched sound produced by the impact of something small and hard against something hard, such as by the operation of a switch, a lock or a latch, or a finger pressed against the thumb and then released to strike the hand or click can be or click can be a detent, pawl, or ratchet, such as that which catches the cogs of a ratchet wheel to prevent backward motion or click can be (us) while clickstream is (computing|marketing) a profile of a user's activity in a web browser or other software, based on what is clicked.

As a verb click

is to cause to make a click; to operate (a switch, etc) so that it makes a click or click can be (obsolete) to snatch or click can be (us).

As an interjection click

is the sound of a click.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

click

English

(wikipedia click)

Etymology 1

Imitative of the "click" sound; first recorded in the 1500s.

Noun

(en noun)
  • A brief, sharp, not particularly loud, relatively high-pitched sound produced by the impact of something small and hard against something hard, such as by the operation of a switch, a lock or a latch, or a finger pressed against the thumb and then released to strike the hand.
  • * 1922 , (Virginia Woolf), (w, Jacob's Room) Chapter 1
  • There was a click in the front sitting-room. Mr. Pearce had extinguished the lamp.
  • (phonetics) An ingressive sound made by coarticulating a velar or uvular closure with another closure.
  • Sound made by a dolphin.
  • The act of operating a switch, etc., so that it clicks.
  • The act of pressing a button on a computer mouse.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-21, author=(Oliver Burkeman)
  • , volume=189, issue=2, page=48, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= The tao of tech , passage=The dirty secret of the internet is that all this distraction and interruption is immensely profitable. Web companies like to boast about:

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To cause to make a click; to operate (a switch, etc) so that it makes a click.
  • * Ben Jonson
  • [Jove] clicked all his marble thumbs.
  • * Thackeray
  • She clicked back the bolt which held the window sash.
  • * Tennyson
  • when merry milkmaids click the latch
  • (direct and indirect) To press and release (a button on a computer mouse).
  • To select a software item using, usually, but not always, the pressing of a mouse button.
  • (advertising) To visit a web site.
  • Visit a location, call, or click www.example.com
  • To emit a click.
  • He bent his fingers back until the joints clicked .
  • To click the left button of a computer mouse while pointing.
  • Click here to go to the next page.
  • To make sense suddenly.
  • Then it clicked - I had been going the wrong way all that time.
  • To get on well.
  • When we met at the party, we just clicked and we’ve been best friends ever since.
  • (dated) To tick.
  • * Goldsmith
  • The varnished clock that clicked behind the door.

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • The sound of a click.
  • Click! The door opened.

    Derived terms

    * click one's fingers * double-click * point-and-click * right-click

    See also

    * ejective * tsk, tsk tsk

    Etymology 2

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Etymology 3

    Compare (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A detent, pawl, or ratchet, such as that which catches the cogs of a ratchet wheel to prevent backward motion.
  • (UK, dialect) The latch of a door.
  • Etymology 4

    (etyl) kleken? clichen? Compare clutch.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To snatch.
  • (Halliwell)
    English intransitive verbs English transitive verbs

    Etymology 5

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (US)
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • (US)
  • ----

    clickstream

    English

    Noun

    (en noun) (wikipedia clickstream)
  • (computing, marketing) A profile of a user's activity in a web browser or other software, based on what is clicked.
  • *{{quote-news, year=2007, date=May 12, author=Dan Mitchell, title=Online Ads vs. Privacy, work=New York Times citation
  • , passage=“My clickstream data is sensitive information,” she told Mr. Zaneis, “and it belongs to me.” }}