Civil vs Oyer - What's the difference?

civil | oyer |


As an adjective civil

is (uncomparable) having to do with people and government office as opposed to the military or religion.

As a noun oyer is

(legal|archaic) a hearing in a civil case which is based on the content of a document, in which the plaintiff is required to produce the document.

civil

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • (uncomparable) Having to do with people and government office as opposed to the military or religion.
  • She went into civil service because she wanted to help the people .
  • (comparable) Behaving in a reasonable or polite manner.
  • It was very civil of him to stop the argument

    Antonyms

    (ant-top) * (l) (ant-mid) * (l) (ant-bottom)

    Derived terms

    * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) ----

    oyer

    English

    Noun

    (-)
  • (legal, archaic) A hearing in a civil case which is based on the content of a document, in which the plaintiff is required to produce the document.
  • Usage notes

    * A defendant who formally asks for oyer is said to (term).

    See also

    * oyer and terminer

    Anagrams

    * ----