Seed vs Child - What's the difference?

seed | child |


As nouns the difference between seed and child

is that seed is (senseid)(countable) a fertilized grain, initially encased in a fruit, which may grow into a mature plant while child is a daughter or son; an offspring.

As a verb seed

is to plant or sow an area with seeds.

seed

English

Noun

(wikipedia seed)
  • (senseid)(countable) A fertilized grain, initially encased in a fruit, which may grow into a mature plant.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= David Van Tassel], [http://www.americanscientist.org/authors/detail/lee-dehaan Lee DeHaan
  • , title= Wild Plants to the Rescue , volume=101, issue=3, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Plant breeding is always a numbers game.
  • (countable, botany) A fertilized ovule, containing an embryonic plant.
  • (uncountable) An amount of fertilized grain that cannot be readily counted.
  • (uncountable) Semen.
  • (countable) A precursor.
  • (countable) The initial state, condition or position of a changing, growing or developing process; the ultimate precursor in a defined chain of precursors.
  • # The initial position of a competitor or team in a tournament. (seed position)
  • The team with the best regular season record receives the top seed in the conference tournament.
  • # The competitor or team occupying a given seed. (seed position)
  • The rookie was a surprising top seed .
  • # Initialization state of a . (seed number)
  • If you use the same seed you will get exactly the same pattern of numbers.
  • # Commercial message in a creative format placed on relevant sites on the Internet. (seed idea or seed message)
  • The latest seed has attracted a lot of users in our online community.
  • Offspring, descendants, progeny.
  • the seed of Abraham
  • * 1590 , , II.x:
  • Next him king Leyr in happie peace long raind, / But had no issue male him to succeed, / But three faire daughters, which were well vptraind, / In all that seemed fit for kingly seed
  • Race; generation; birth.
  • * Waller
  • Of mortal seed they were not held.

    Usage notes

    The common use of seed differs from the botanical use. The “seeds” of sunflowers are botanically fruits.

    Derived terms

    * crack seed * go to seed * seedcake * seedling * seed potato * seedy * spill one's seed

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To plant or sow an area with seeds.
  • I seeded my lawn with bluegrass.
  • To cover thinly with something scattered; to ornament with seedlike decorations.
  • * Ben Jonson
  • a sable mantle seeded with waking eyes
  • To start; to provide, assign or determine the initial resources for, position of, state of.
  • A venture capitalist seeds young companies.
    The tournament coordinator will seed the starting lineup with the best competitors from the qualifying round.
    The programmer seeded fresh, uncorrupted data into the database before running unit tests.
  • (sports, games) To allocate a seeding to a competitor.
  • To be able to compete (especially in a quarter-final/semi-final/final).
  • The tennis player seeded into the quarters.
  • To ejaculate inside the penetratee during intercourse, especially in the rectum.
  • Anagrams

    *

    child

    English

    Alternative forms

    * (l) (archaic)

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • A daughter or son; an offspring.
  • (figuratively) An offspring; one born in, or considered a product of the culture of, a place.
  • * 1984 , Mary Jane Matz, The Many Lives of Otto Kahn: A Biography , page 5:
  • For more than forty years, he preached the creed of art and beauty. He was heir to the ancient wisdom of Israel, a child of Germany, a subject of Great Britain, later an American citizen, but in truth a citizen of the world.
  • (figuratively) A member of a tribe, a people or a race of beings; one born into or considered a product of a people.
  • * 2009 , Edward John Moreton Dunsany, Tales of Wonder , page 64:
  • Plash-Goo was of the children of the giants, whose sire was Uph. And the lineage of Uph had dwindled in bulk for the last five hundred years, till the giants were now no more than fifteen foot high; but Uph ate elephants
  • (figuratively) A thing or abstraction derived from or caused by something.
  • * 1991 , (w, Midnight's Children) , (Salman Rushdie) (title)
  • A person who is below the age of adulthood; a minor (person who is below the legal age of responsibility or accountability).
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-07, author=(Joseph Stiglitz)
  • , volume=188, issue=26, page=19, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Globalisation is about taxes too , passage=It is time the international community faced the reality: we have an unmanageable, unfair, distortionary global tax regime. […] It is the starving of the public sector which has been pivotal in America no longer being the land of opportunity – with a child' s life prospects more dependent on the income and education of its parents than in other advanced countries.}}
  • (computing) A data item, process or object which has a subservient or derivative role relative to another data item, process or object.
  • * 2011 , John Mongan, ?Noah Kindler, ?Eric Giguère, Programming Interviews Exposed
  • The algorithm pops the stack to obtain a new current node when there are no more children (when it reaches a leaf).
  • (obsolete) A female infant; a girl.
  • * Shakespeare
  • A boy or a child , I wonder?

    Synonyms

    * (daughter or son) boy, fruit of one's loins, girl, kid, offspring * (young person) bairn, boy, brat, girl, kid, lad, lass * See also

    Antonyms

    * (daughter or son) father, mother, parent * (person below the age of adulthood) adult * parent

    Derived terms

    * boomerang child * childhood * childish * childless * childlike * love-child * lovechild * manchild * middle child * only child * perpetual child * problem child * schoolchild * war child * with child

    See also

    * orling

    References

    * Merriam-Webster's Online Dictionary (accessed November 2007). * American Heritage Dictionary , Fourth Edition, Houghton Mifflin Company (2003). English nouns with irregular plurals 1000 English basic words