Nag vs Chide - What's the difference?

nag | chide |


As verbs the difference between nag and chide

is that nag is to repeatedly remind or complain to someone in an annoying way, often about insignificant matters while chide is to admonish in blame; to reproach angrily.

As a noun nag

is a small horse; a pony or nag can be one who.

nag

English

Etymology 1

(etyl) nagge'', cognate with Dutch ''negge

Noun

(en noun)
  • A small horse; a pony.
  • An old useless horse.
  • (obsolete, derogatory) A paramour.
  • * 1598 , , III. x. 11:
  • Yon ribaudred nag of Egypt – Whom leprosy o'ertake!
    Synonyms
    * (old useless horse) dobbin, hack, jade, plug
    Coordinate terms
    * (old useless horse) bum (racing )

    Etymology 2

    Probably from a (etyl) source; compare Swedish .

    Verb

    (nagg)
  • To repeatedly remind or complain to someone in an annoying way, often about insignificant matters.
  • To act inappropriately in the eyes of peers, to backstab, to verbally abuse.
  • To bother with persistent memories.
  • The notion that he forgot something nagged him the rest of the day.
  • Other sorts of persistent annoyance, e.g.:
  • A nagging pain in his left knee
    A nagging north wind

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One who .
  • Anagrams

    * * * * ----

    chide

    English

    Verb

  • To admonish in blame; to reproach angrily.
  • 1591' ''And yet I was last '''chidden for being too slow.'' — Shakespeare, ''The Two Gentlemen of Verona , .
    1598' ''If the scorn of your bright eyne / Have power to raise such love in mine, / Alack, in me what strange effect / Would they work in mild aspect? / Whiles you '''chid me, I did love'' — Shakespeare, ''As You Like It , .
    {{quote-book
    , year=1920 , year_published=2008 , edition=HTML , editor= , author=Edgar Rice Burroughs , title=Thuvia, Maiden of Mars , chapter= citation , genre= , publisher=The Gutenberg Project , isbn= , page= , passage=Then she had not chidden' him for the use of that familiar salutation, nor did she ' chide him now, though she was promised to another. }}
  • (obsolete) To utter words of disapprobation and displeasure; to find fault; to contend angrily.
  • 1611' ''And Jacob was wroth, and '''chode with Laban: and Jacob answered and said to Laban, What is my trespass? what is my sin, that thou hast so hotly pursued after me? — Genesis 31:36 KJV.
  • (ambitransitive) To make a clamorous noise; to chafe.
  • * Shakespeare
  • As doth a rock against the chiding flood.
  • * Shakespeare
  • the sea that chides the banks of England

    Synonyms

    * See also