Worry vs Chew - What's the difference?

worry | chew | Related terms |

Worry is a related term of chew.


As verbs the difference between worry and chew

is that worry is to seize or shake by the throat, especially of a dog or wolf while chew is to crush with the teeth by repeated closing and opening of the jaws; done to food to soften it and break it down by the action of saliva before it is swallowed.

As nouns the difference between worry and chew

is that worry is a strong feeling of anxiety while chew is a small sweet, such as a taffy, that is eaten by chewing.

worry

English

Verb

(en-verb)
  • To seize or shake by the throat, especially of a dog or wolf.
  • Your dog’s been worrying sheep again.
  • To harass; to irritate or distress.
  • The President was worried into military action by persistent advisors.
  • Disturb the peace of mind of; afflict with mental agitation or distress.
  • Your tone of voice worries me.
  • To be troubled, to give way to mental anxiety.
  • Stop worrying about your test, it’ll be fine.
  • (transitive, obsolete, except in Scots) To strangle.
  • To cause concern or anxiety.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-10, volume=408, issue=8848, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Can China clean up fast enough? , passage=That worries the government, which fears that environmental activism could become the foundation for more general political opposition.}}

    Synonyms

    * (trouble mentally) fret

    Noun

    (worries)
  • A strong feeling of anxiety.
  • :
  • An instance or cause of such a feeling.
  • :
  • Derived terms

    * worried * worrisome

    chew

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To crush with the teeth by repeated closing and opening of the jaws; done to food to soften it and break it down by the action of saliva before it is swallowed.
  • Make sure to chew thoroughly, and don't talk with your mouth full!
    The steak was tough to chew as it had been cooked too long.
  • To grind, tear, or otherwise degrade or demolish something with teeth or as with teeth.
  • He keep his feed in steel drums to prevent the mice from chewing holes in the feed-sacks.
    The harsh desert wind and sand had chewed the stump into ragged strips of wood.
  • (informal) To think about something; to ponder; to chew over.
  • The professor stood at the blackboard, chalk in hand, and chewed the question the student had asked.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Old politicians chew wisdom past.
  • * Prior
  • He chews revenge, abjuring his offense.

    Synonyms

    * (crush food with teeth prior to swallowing) bite, chavel, chomp, crunch, masticate * (degrade or demolish as if with teeth) grind, pulverize, rip, shred, tear * (think about) contemplate, ruminate, mull, muse, ponder * See also

    Derived terms

    * chewing gum * chew out * chew over * chew the cud * chew the fat * chew the scenery * chew up * chewy

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A small sweet, such as a taffy, that is eaten by chewing.
  • Phillip purchased a bag of licorice chews at the drugstore.
  • (informal, uncountable) Chewing tobacco.
  • The school had banned chew and smokes from the school grounds, even for adults.
  • (countable, or, uncountable) A plug or wad of chewing tobacco; chaw or a chaw.
  • ''The ballplayers sat on the bench watching the rain, glumly working their chews .
    The first time he chewed tobacco, he swallowed his chew and got extremely sick.

    Derived terms

    * chew toy * penny chew