Dwell vs Chew - What's the difference?

dwell | chew | Related terms |

Dwell is a related term of chew.


As nouns the difference between dwell and chew

is that dwell is (engineering) a period of time in which a system or component remains in a given state while chew is a small sweet, such as a taffy, that is eaten by chewing.

As verbs the difference between dwell and chew

is that dwell is to live; to reside while chew is to crush with the teeth by repeated closing and opening of the jaws; done to food to soften it and break it down by the action of saliva before it is swallowed.

dwell

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • (engineering) A period of time in which a system or component remains in a given state.
  • (engineering) A brief pause in the motion of part of a mechanism to allow an operation to be completed.
  • (electrical engineering) A planned delay in a timed control program.
  • (automotive) In a petrol engine, the period of time the ignition points are closed to let current flow through the ignition coil in between each spark. This is measured as an angle in degrees around the camshaft in the distributor which controls the points, for example in a 4-cylinder engine it might be 55° (spark at 90° intervals, points closed for 55° between each).
  • Verb

  • To live; to reside.
  • * Peacham
  • the parish in which I was born, dwell , and have possessions
  • * C. J. Smith
  • The poor man dwells in a humble cottage near the hall where the lord of the domain resides.
  • To linger (on ) a particular thought, idea etc.; to remain fixated (on).
  • (engineering) To be in a given state.
  • To abide; to remain; to continue.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I'll rather dwell in my necessity.
  • * Wordsworth
  • Thy soul was like a star and dwelt apart.

    See also

    * abide * live * reside * stay

    References

    * * English irregular verbs

    chew

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To crush with the teeth by repeated closing and opening of the jaws; done to food to soften it and break it down by the action of saliva before it is swallowed.
  • Make sure to chew thoroughly, and don't talk with your mouth full!
    The steak was tough to chew as it had been cooked too long.
  • To grind, tear, or otherwise degrade or demolish something with teeth or as with teeth.
  • He keep his feed in steel drums to prevent the mice from chewing holes in the feed-sacks.
    The harsh desert wind and sand had chewed the stump into ragged strips of wood.
  • (informal) To think about something; to ponder; to chew over.
  • The professor stood at the blackboard, chalk in hand, and chewed the question the student had asked.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Old politicians chew wisdom past.
  • * Prior
  • He chews revenge, abjuring his offense.

    Synonyms

    * (crush food with teeth prior to swallowing) bite, chavel, chomp, crunch, masticate * (degrade or demolish as if with teeth) grind, pulverize, rip, shred, tear * (think about) contemplate, ruminate, mull, muse, ponder * See also

    Derived terms

    * chewing gum * chew out * chew over * chew the cud * chew the fat * chew the scenery * chew up * chewy

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A small sweet, such as a taffy, that is eaten by chewing.
  • Phillip purchased a bag of licorice chews at the drugstore.
  • (informal, uncountable) Chewing tobacco.
  • The school had banned chew and smokes from the school grounds, even for adults.
  • (countable, or, uncountable) A plug or wad of chewing tobacco; chaw or a chaw.
  • ''The ballplayers sat on the bench watching the rain, glumly working their chews .
    The first time he chewed tobacco, he swallowed his chew and got extremely sick.

    Derived terms

    * chew toy * penny chew