Checker vs Counterchange - What's the difference?

checker | counterchange |


As nouns the difference between checker and counterchange

is that checker is one who checks something or checker can be a playing piece in the game of checkers (british: draughts) or checker can be the fruit of the wild service tree or chequer tree, while counterchange is (obsolete) an exchange of one thing for another.

As verbs the difference between checker and counterchange

is that checker is to mark in a pattern of alternating light and dark spots, like a checkerboard while counterchange is to give and receive; to cause to change places; to exchange.

checker

English

Alternative forms

* chequer

Etymology 1

Noun

(en noun)
  • One who checks something.
  • The clerk who tallies cost of purchases and accepts payment.
  • ''There was a long line at the grocery store because the checker was so slow.

    Etymology 2

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A playing piece in the game of checkers (British: draughts).
  • Derived terms
    * checkerboard

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To mark in a pattern of alternating light and dark spots, like a checkerboard.
  • To develop markings in a pattern of alternating light and dark spots, like a checkerboard.
  • Etymology 3

    Alteration of (chequer)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The fruit of the wild service tree or chequer tree,
  • Usage notes
    * Almost always spelled chequer, because the tree itself is native to areas where that spelling is used, and is pretty much unknown in areas that use the other spelling.
    Derived terms
    * checkerberry

    Anagrams

    * ----

    counterchange

    English

    Verb

    (counterchang)
  • To give and receive; to cause to change places; to exchange.
  • To checker; to diversify, as in heraldic counterchanging.
  • * Tennyson
  • Witch-elms that counterchange the floor / Of this flat lawn with dusk and bright.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) An exchange of one thing for another.
  • (obsolete) Due return (for an action etc.); reciprocation.
  • * 1590 , Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene , III.ix:
  • But Paridell sore brused with the blow, / Could not arise, the counterchaunge to scorse [...].

    References

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