Gaudy vs Cheap - What's the difference?

gaudy | cheap | Synonyms |

Gaudy is a synonym of cheap.


In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between gaudy and cheap

is that gaudy is (obsolete) gay; merry; festive while cheap is (obsolete) to sell.

As adjectives the difference between gaudy and cheap

is that gaudy is very showy or ornamented, now especially when excessive, or in a tasteless or vulgar manner while cheap is low and/or reduced in price.

As nouns the difference between gaudy and cheap

is that gaudy is one of the large beads in the rosary at which the paternoster is recited or gaudy can be a reunion held by one of the colleges of the university of oxford for alumni, normally held during the summer vacations while cheap is trade; traffic; chaffer; chaffering.

As a verb cheap is

(obsolete) to trade; traffic; bargain; chaffer; ask the price of goods; cheapen goods.

As an adverb cheap is

cheaply.

gaudy

English

Etymology 1

Origin uncertain; perhaps from . A common claim that the word derives from , is not supported by evidence (the word was in use at least half a century before Gaudí was born).

Adjective

(er)
  • very showy or ornamented, now especially when excessive, or in a tasteless or vulgar manner
  • * Shakespeare
  • Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, / But not expressed in fancy; rich, not gaudy .
  • * 1813 , , Pride and Prejudice
  • The rooms were lofty and handsome, and their furniture suitable to the fortune of its proprietor; but Elizabeth saw, with admiration of his taste, that it was neither gaudy nor uselessly fine; with less of splendour, and more real elegance, than the furniture of Rosings.
  • * 1887 , Homer Greene, Burnham Breaker
  • A large gaudy , flowing cravat, and an ill-used silk hat, set well back on the wearer's head, completed this somewhat noticeable costume.
  • * 2005 , Thomas Hauser & Marilyn Cole Lownes, "How Bling-bling Took Over the Ring", The Observer , 9 January 2005
  • Gaudy jewellery might offend some people's sense of style. But former heavyweight champion and grilling-machine entrepreneur George Foreman is philosophical about today's craze for bling-bling.
  • (obsolete) gay; merry; festive
  • (Tennyson)
  • * Shakespeare
  • Let's have one other gaudy night.
  • * Twain
  • And then, there he was, slim and handsome, and dressed the gaudiest and prettiest you ever saw...
    Synonyms
    * (excessively showy) tawdry, flashy, garish, kitschy *
    Derived terms
    * gaudily * gaudy night

    Noun

    (gaudies)
  • One of the large beads in the rosary at which the paternoster is recited.
  • (Gower)

    Etymology 2

    From Latin gaudium "joy".

    Noun

    (gaudies)
  • A reunion held by one of the colleges of the University of Oxford for alumni, normally held during the summer vacations.
  • cheap

    English

    Alternative forms

    * (l), (l) (dialectal)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Trade; traffic; chaffer; chaffering.
  • A market; marketplace.
  • Price.
  • A low price; a bargain.
  • * Shakespeare
  • The sack that thou hast drunk me would have bought me lights as good cheap at the dearest chandler's in Europe.
  • Cheapness; lowness of price; abundance of supply.
  • Adjective

    (er)
  • Low and/or reduced in price.
  • * John Locke
  • Where there are a great sellers to a few buyers, there the thing to be sold will be cheap .
  • * , chapter=3
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=One saint's day in mid-term a certain newly appointed suffragan-bishop came to the school chapel, and there preached on “The Inner Life.”  He at once secured attention by his informal method, and when presently the coughing of Jarvis […] interrupted the sermon, he altogether captivated his audience with a remark about cough lozenges being cheap and easily procurable.}}
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-20, volume=408, issue=8845, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Out of the gloom , passage=[Rural solar plant] schemes are of little help to industry or other heavy users of electricity. Nor is solar power yet as cheap as the grid. For all that, the rapid arrival of electric light to Indian villages is long overdue. When the national grid suffers its next huge outage, as it did in July 2012 when hundreds of millions were left in the dark, look for specks of light in the villages.}}
  • Of poor quality.
  • Of little worth.
  • * Dryden
  • You grow cheap in every subject's eye.
  • (slang, of an action or tactic in a game of skill) underhand; dubious.
  • (derogatory) Frugal; stingy.
  • Synonyms
    * bargain, inexpensive, frugal, no frills, priced-off * (of poor quality) flimsy
    Antonyms
    * (low or reduced in price) dear, expensive, high-priced, pricey, * (of low value) precious, valuable
    See also
    *

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To trade; traffic; bargain; chaffer; ask the price of goods; cheapen goods.
  • (obsolete) To bargain for; chaffer for; ask the price of; offer a price for; cheapen.
  • (obsolete) To buy; purchase.
  • (obsolete) To sell.
  • Usage notes

    Use of cheap as a verb has been surpassed by .

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • Cheaply.
  • (Milton)

    Anagrams

    * * 1000 English basic words ----