Scene vs Chapter - What's the difference?

scene | chapter | Related terms |

Scene is a related term of chapter.


As nouns the difference between scene and chapter

is that scene is scene, stage while chapter is one of the main sections into which the text of a book is divided.

As a verb chapter is

to divide into chapters.

scene

English

(wikipedia scene)

Alternative forms

* (archaic)

Noun

(en noun)
  • The location of an event that attracts attention.
  • the scene of the crime
  • (theater) The structure on which a spectacle or play is exhibited; the part of a theater in which the acting is done, with its adjuncts and decorations; the stage.
  • They stood in the centre of the scene .
  • The decorations and fittings of a stage, representing the place in which the action is supposed to go on; one of the slides, or other devices, used to give an appearance of reality to the action of a play; as, to paint scenes; to shift the scenes; to go behind the scenes.
  • So much of a play as passes without change of locality or time, or important change of character; hence, a subdivision of an act; a separate portion of a play, subordinate to the act, but differently determined in different plays; as, an act of four scenes.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1905, author=
  • , title= , chapter=2 citation , passage=Miss Phyllis Morgan, as the hapless heroine dressed in the shabbiest of clothes, appears in the midst of a gay and giddy throng; she apostrophises all and sundry there, including the villain, and has a magnificent scene which always brings down the house, and nightly adds to her histrionic laurels.}}
    The play is divided into three acts, and in total twenty-five scenes .
    The most moving scene is the final one, where he realizes he has wasted his whole life.
    There were some very erotic scenes in the movie, although it was not classified as pornography.
  • The place, time, circumstance, etc., in which anything occurs, or in which the action of a story, play, or the like, is laid; surroundings amid which anything is set before the imagination; place of occurrence, exhibition, or action.
  • * Shakespeare
  • In Troy, there lies the scene .
  • * J. M. Mason
  • The world is a vast scene of strife.
  • An assemblage of objects presented to the view at once; a series of actions and events exhibited in their connection; a spectacle; a show; an exhibition; a view.
  • He assessed the scene to check for any danger, and agreed it was safe.
  • * Addison
  • Through what new scenes and changes must we pass!
  • A landscape, or part of a landscape; scenery.
  • * Dryden
  • A sylvan scene with various greens was drawn, / Shades on the sides, and in the midst a lawn.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham)
  • , title=(The China Governess) , chapter=Foreword citation , passage=He turned back to the scene before him and the enormous new block of council dwellings. The design was some way after Corbusier but the block was built up on plinths and resembled an Atlantic liner swimming diagonally across the site.}}
  • An exhibition of passionate or strong feeling before others, creating embarrassment or disruption; often, an artificial or affected action, or course of action, done for effect; a theatrical display; make, create, cause a scene .
  • They saw an angry scene outside the pub.
    ''The crazy lady made a scene in the grocery store.
  • * De Quincey
  • Probably no lover of scenes would have had very long to wait or some explosions between parties, both equally ready to take offence, and careless of giving it.
  • An element of fiction writing.
  • A social environment consisting of an informal, vague group of people with a uniting interest; their sphere of activity; a subculture.
  • She got into the emo scene at an early age.

    Derived terms

    * behind-the-scenes * crime scene * cut scene * deleted scene * Nativity Scene * primal scene * scene-dock * scene kid * scene-shifter * scenic * scenery * scenic route * sex scene

    See also

    * proscenium

    Verb

    (scen)
  • To exhibit as a scene; to make a scene of; to display.
  • Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * ----

    chapter

    English

    Alternative forms

    * chaptre (obsolete)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One of the main sections into which the text of a book is divided.
  • :
  • *
  • *:At her invitation he outlined for her the succeeding chapters with terse military accuracy?; and what she liked best and best understood was avoidance of that false modesty which condescends, turning technicality into pabulum.
  • A section of a social or religious body.
  • #An administrative division of an organization, usually local to a specific area.
  • #An assembly of monks, or of the prebends and other clergymen connected with a cathedral, conventual, or collegiate church, or of a diocese, usually presided over by the dean.
  • #A community of canons or canonesses.
  • #A bishop's council.
  • #An organized branch of some society or fraternity, such as the Freemasons.
  • #:(Robertson)
  • #A meeting of certain organized societies or orders.
  • #A chapter house.
  • #:(Burrill)
  • A sequence (of events), especially when presumed related and likely to continue.
  • *1866 , (Wilkie Collins), , Book the Last, Chapter I,
  • *:"You know that Mr. Armadale is alive," pursued the doctor, "and you know that he is coming back to England. Why do you continue to wear your widow's dress?" ¶ She answered him without an instant's hesitation, steadily going on with her work. ¶ "Because I am of a sanguine disposition, like you. I mean to trust to the chapter of accidents to the very last. Mr. Armadale may die yet, on his way home."
  • *1911 , (Bram Stoker), , Ch.26,
  • *:she determined to go on slowly towards Castra Regis, and trust to the chapter of accidents to pick up the trail again.
  • A decretal epistle.
  • :(Ayliffe)
  • (lb) A location or compartment.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:In his bosom! In what chapter of his bosom?
  • Derived terms

    * chapter and verse * chapter house * to the end of the chapter

    See also

    * overarching

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To divide into chapters.
  • To put into a chapter.
  • To use administrative procedure to remove someone.
  • * 2001 , John Palmer Hawkins, Army of Hope, Army of Alienation: Culture and Contradiction in the American Army Communities of Cold War Germany , page 117,
  • If you're a single parent [soldier] and you can't find someone to take care of your children, they will chapter you out [administrative elimination from the service]. And yet if you use someone not certified, they get mad.
  • * 2006 , Thomas R. Schombert, Diaries of a Soldier: Nightmares from Within , page 100,
  • "He also wanted me to give you a message. He said that if you don't get your shit ready for this deployment, then he will chapter you out of his freakin' army."

    Anagrams

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