Saga vs Chapter - What's the difference?

saga | chapter |


As nouns the difference between saga and chapter

is that saga is saga while chapter is one of the main sections into which the text of a book is divided.

As a verb chapter is

to divide into chapters.

saga

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • An Old Norse (Icelandic) prose narrative, especially one dealing with family or social histories and legends.
  • Something with the qualities of such a saga; an epic, a long story.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=October 1, author=David Ornstein, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= Blackburn 0-4 Man City , passage=Manchester City put the Carlos Tevez saga behind them with a classy victory at Blackburn that keeps them level on points with leaders Manchester United.}}
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-08, volume=407, issue=8839, page=55, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Obama goes troll-hunting , passage=According to this saga of intellectual-property misanthropy, these creatures [patent trolls] roam the business world, buying up patents and then using them to demand extravagant payouts from companies they accuse of infringing them. Often, their victims pay up rather than face the costs of a legal battle.}}

    Anagrams

    * ----

    chapter

    English

    Alternative forms

    * chaptre (obsolete)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One of the main sections into which the text of a book is divided.
  • :
  • *
  • *:At her invitation he outlined for her the succeeding chapters with terse military accuracy?; and what she liked best and best understood was avoidance of that false modesty which condescends, turning technicality into pabulum.
  • A section of a social or religious body.
  • #An administrative division of an organization, usually local to a specific area.
  • #An assembly of monks, or of the prebends and other clergymen connected with a cathedral, conventual, or collegiate church, or of a diocese, usually presided over by the dean.
  • #A community of canons or canonesses.
  • #A bishop's council.
  • #An organized branch of some society or fraternity, such as the Freemasons.
  • #:(Robertson)
  • #A meeting of certain organized societies or orders.
  • #A chapter house.
  • #:(Burrill)
  • A sequence (of events), especially when presumed related and likely to continue.
  • *1866 , (Wilkie Collins), , Book the Last, Chapter I,
  • *:"You know that Mr. Armadale is alive," pursued the doctor, "and you know that he is coming back to England. Why do you continue to wear your widow's dress?" ¶ She answered him without an instant's hesitation, steadily going on with her work. ¶ "Because I am of a sanguine disposition, like you. I mean to trust to the chapter of accidents to the very last. Mr. Armadale may die yet, on his way home."
  • *1911 , (Bram Stoker), , Ch.26,
  • *:she determined to go on slowly towards Castra Regis, and trust to the chapter of accidents to pick up the trail again.
  • A decretal epistle.
  • :(Ayliffe)
  • (lb) A location or compartment.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:In his bosom! In what chapter of his bosom?
  • Derived terms

    * chapter and verse * chapter house * to the end of the chapter

    See also

    * overarching

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To divide into chapters.
  • To put into a chapter.
  • To use administrative procedure to remove someone.
  • * 2001 , John Palmer Hawkins, Army of Hope, Army of Alienation: Culture and Contradiction in the American Army Communities of Cold War Germany , page 117,
  • If you're a single parent [soldier] and you can't find someone to take care of your children, they will chapter you out [administrative elimination from the service]. And yet if you use someone not certified, they get mad.
  • * 2006 , Thomas R. Schombert, Diaries of a Soldier: Nightmares from Within , page 100,
  • "He also wanted me to give you a message. He said that if you don't get your shit ready for this deployment, then he will chapter you out of his freakin' army."

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