Turnover vs Change - What's the difference?

turnover | change |


As nouns the difference between turnover and change

is that turnover is the act or result of overturning something; an upset while change is (lb) change.

As an adjective turnover

is capable of being turned over; designed to be turned over.

turnover

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • The act or result of overturning something; an upset.
  • a bad turnover in a carriage
  • The amount of money taken as sales transacted in a calendar year
  • The company had an annual turnover of $500,000.
  • The number of times that stock is replaced after being used or sold, a worker is replaced after leaving, or a property changes hands
  • Those apartments have a high turnover because they are so close to the railroad tracks.
    High staff-turnover can lead to low morale amongst employees
  • A semicircular pastry made by turning one half of a circular crust over the other, enclosing the filling (usually fruit).
  • They only served me one apple turnover for breakfast.
  • (sports) A loss of possession of the ball without scoring.
  • The Nimrods committed another dismaying turnover en route to another humiliating loss.
  • (dated) An apprentice, in any trade, who is handed over from one master to another to complete his time.
  • Adjective

    (-)
  • Capable of being turned over; designed to be turned over.
  • a turnover collar

    Anagrams

    *

    change

    English

    Verb

    (chang)
  • To become something different.
  • (ergative) To make something into something different.
  • * {{quote-magazine, title=The climate of Tibet: Pole-land
  • , date=2013-05-11, volume=407, issue=8835, page=80 , magazine=(The Economist) citation , passage=Of all the transitions brought about on the Earth’s surface by temperature change, the melting of ice into water is the starkest. It is binary. And for the land beneath, the air above and the life around, it changes everything.}}
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=July-August, author= Catherine Clabby
  • , magazine=(American Scientist), title= Focus on Everything , passage=Not long ago, it was difficult to produce photographs of tiny creatures with every part in focus.
  • To replace.
  • To replace one's clothing.
  • To transfer to another vehicle (train, bus, etc.)
  • (archaic) To exchange.
  • * 1610 , , by (William Shakespeare), act 1 scene 2
  • At the first sight / they have changed eyes. (exchanged looks )
  • * 1662 , Galileo's Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems (Dialogue 2):
  • I would give any thing to change a word or two with this person.
  • To change hand while riding (a horse).
  • to change a horse

    Synonyms

    * (to make something different) alter, modify * (to make something into something different) transform

    Derived terms

    * changeable * change by reversal * change course * change direction * changeful * change out * change hands * change horses in midstream * change integrity * changeling * change one's mind * change one's tune * change places * change tack * change the channel * change the subject * change up * chop and change * everchanging * get changed * leopard change his spots * presto change-o *

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (countable) The process of becoming different.
  • * {{quote-magazine, title=The climate of Tibet: Pole-land
  • , date=2013-05-11, volume=407, issue=8835, page=80 , magazine=(The Economist) citation , passage=Of all the transitions brought about on the Earth’s surface by temperature change , the melting of ice into water is the starkest. It is binary. And for the land beneath, the air above and the life around, it changes everything.}}
    The product is undergoing a change in order to improve it.
  • (uncountable) Small denominations of money given in exchange for a larger denomination.
  • Can I get change for this $100 bill please?
  • (countable) A replacement, e.g. a change of clothes
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2010 , date=December 29 , author=Mark Vesty , title=Wigan 2 - 2 Arsenal , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=After beating champions Chelsea 3-1 on Boxing Day, Arsenal boss Arsene Wenger made eight changes to his starting XI in an effort to freshen things up, with games against Birmingham and Manchester City to come in the next seven days.}}
  • (uncountable) Money given back when a customer hands over more than the exact price of an item.
  • A customer who pays with a 10-pound note for a £9 item receives one pound in change .
  • (countable) A transfer between vehicles.
  • The train journey from Bristol to Nottingham includes a change at Birmingham.
  • (baseball) A change-up pitch.
  • (lb) Any order in which a number of bells are struck, other than that of the diatonic scale.
  • * Holder
  • Four bells admit twenty-four changes in ringing.
  • A place where merchants and others meet to transact business; an exchange.
  • A public house; an alehouse.
  • * Burt
  • They call an alehouse a change .

    Usage notes

    * Adjectives often applied to "change": big, small, major, minor, dramatic, drastic, rapid, slow, gradual, radical, evolutionary, revolutionary, abrupt, sudden, unexpected, incremental, social, economic, organizational, technological, personal, cultural, political, technical, environmental, institutional, educational, genetic, physical, chemical, industrial, geological, global, local, good, bad, positive, negative, significant, important, structural, strategic, tactical.

    Synonyms

    (the process of becoming different) transition, transformation

    Derived terms

    * and change * breaking change * bureau de change * chump change * cool change * change agent * change key * change-off * change of heart * change of innings * change of life * change of mind * change of state * change order * change ringing * change-up * chemical change * chump change * climate change * deflection change * fatty change * net change * oil change * phase change * quick-change * regime change * sea change * seed change * sex change * shortchange * small change * sound change * spare change * step change * technological change * the change

    See also

    * modification * mutation * evolution * exchange * reorganization

    References

    *