Switch vs Chance - What's the difference?

switch | chance |


As a noun switch

is a device to turn electric current on]] and [[turn off|off or direct its flow.

As a verb switch

is to exchange.

As an adjective switch

is (snowboarding) riding with their opposite foot forward from their natural position bbc sport, [http://wwwbbccouk/sport/0/winter-olympics/26141070 "sochi 2014: a jargon-busting guide to the halfpipe"], 11 february 2014 .

As a proper noun chance is

, an american pet form of chauncey, in modern usage also associated with the word chance.

switch

English

Noun

(es)
  • A device to turn electric current on]] and [[turn off, off or direct its flow.
  • A change.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=January 19 , author=Jonathan Stevenson , title=Leeds 1 - 3 Arsenal , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=Wenger sent on Cesc Fabregas and Van Persie to try to finish Leeds off and with 14 minutes left the switch paid off as the Spaniard sent Bendtner away down the right and his wonderful curling cross was headed in by Van Persie at the far post. }}
  • (rail transport, US) A movable section of railroad track which allows the train to be directed down one of two destination tracks; point.
  • A slender woody plant stem used as a whip; a thin, flexible rod, associated with corporal punishment in the United States.
  • * 2007 , Jeffrey W. Hamilton, Raising Godly Children in a Wicked World , Lulu.com, page 15:
  • "A proper switch is a slim, flexible branch off a tree or a bush. A switch applied to the buttocks stings fiercely. It may leave red marks or bruises, but it causes no lasting damage. ."
  • (computer science) A command line notation allowing specification of optional behavior.
  • Use the /b switch to specify black-and-white printing.
  • (computing, programming) A programming construct that takes different actions depending on the value of an expression.
  • * 2004', "Curt", ''Can I use IF statements, and still use '''switches ?'' (on newsgroup ''microsoft.public.word.mailmerge.fields )
  • (computing, networking) A networking device connecting multiple wires, allowing them to communicate simultaneously, when possible. Compare to the less efficient hub device that solely duplicates network packets to each wire.
  • (telecommunication) A system of specialized relays, computer hardware, or other equipment which allows the interconnection of a calling party's telephone line with any called party's line.
  • (BDSM) One who is willing to take either a sadistic or a masochistic role.
  • * 2012 , Terri-Jean Bedford, Bondage Bungalow Fantasies (page 99)
  • Ideally, if one of your ladies happens to be a switch (or would be willing to switch for this scene), I would love to be able to inflict a little "revenge tickling" as well, as part of a scenario.
  • A separate mass or tress of hair, or of some substance (such as jute) made to resemble hair, formerly worn on the head by women.
  • Synonyms

    * (section of railroad track) (UK ) points * (whip) crop * (command-line notation) flag, option, specifier

    Derived terms

    * asleep at the switch * dipswitch * light switch * railway switch * switchback * switchblade * switchboard * switcheroo * switchout

    Verb

    (es)
  • To exchange.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-01, volume=407, issue=8838
  • , page=13 (Technology Quarterly), magazine=(The Economist) , title= Ideas coming down the track , passage=A “moving platform” scheme
  • To change (something) to the specified state using a switch.
  • To whip or hit with a switch.
  • * 1899 , (Joseph Conrad),
  • They were looking on the ground, absorbed in thought. The manager was switching his leg with a slender twig: his sagacious relative lifted his head.
  • To change places, tasks, etc.
  • (slang) To get angry suddenly; to quickly or unreasonably become enraged.
  • To swing or whisk.
  • to switch a cane
  • To be swung or whisked.
  • The angry cat's tail switched back and forth.
  • To trim.
  • to switch a hedge
    (Halliwell)
  • To turn from one railway track to another; to transfer by a switch; generally with off'', ''from , etc.
  • to switch''' off a train; to '''switch a car from one track to another
  • (ecclesiastical) To shift to another circuit.
  • Adjective

    (-)
  • (snowboarding) riding with their opposite foot forward from their natural position. BBC Sport, "Sochi 2014: A jargon-busting guide to the halfpipe", 11 February 2014
  • Coordinate terms

    (snowboarding) * goofy * regular

    See also

    * switch off * switch on

    References

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    chance

    English

    Alternative forms

    * chaunce (obsolete)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (countable) An opportunity or possibility.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=2 , passage=Here was my chance . I took the old man aside, and two or three glasses of Old Crow launched him into reminiscence.}}
  • (uncountable) Random occurrence; luck.
  • (countable) The probability of something happening.
  • Derived terms

    (Terms derived from the noun "chance") * Buckley's chance * by chance * chance'd be a fine thing * chance fracture * chance-medley * chancer * chances are * chancy * Chinaman's chance * dog's chance * even chance * fair chance * fat chance * fighting chance * first-chance exception * game of chance * half a chance * happy chance * in with a chance * jump at the chance * last chance * last chance saloon * main chance * mum chance * not a chance * off chance/off-chance * outside chance * perchance * slim chance * smart chance * snowball's chance * snowball's chance in hell * sporting chance * stand a chance

    Verb

    (chanc)
  • (archaic) To happen by chance, to occur.
  • It chanced that I found a solution the very next day.
  • * Bible, Deuteronomy xxii. 6
  • if a bird's nest chance to be before thee
  • * Shakespeare
  • I chanced on this letter.
  • * 1843 , (Thomas Carlyle), '', book 2, ch. XV, ''Practical — Devotional
  • Once it chanced that Geoffrey Riddell (Bishop of Ely), a Prelate rather troublesome to (w), made a request of him for timber from his woods towards certain edifices going on at (Glemsford).
  • * 1847 , , (Jane Eyre), Chapter XVIII
  • Mr. Mason, shivering as some one chanced to open the door, asked for more coal to be put on the fire, which had burnt out its flame, though its mass of cinder still shone hot and red. The footman who brought the coal, in going out, stopped near Mr. Eshton's chair, and said something to him in a low voice, of which I heard only the words, "old woman,"—"quite troublesome."
  • (archaic) To befall; to happen to.
  • * 1826 , William Lambarde, A Perambulation of Kent
  • To try or risk.
  • Shall we carry the umbrella, or chance a rainstorm?
  • * W. D. Howells
  • Come what will, I will chance it.
  • To discover something by chance.
  • He chanced upon a kindly stranger who showed him the way.

    Derived terms

    * (l) * * (l)

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (rare) Happening]] by [[#Noun, chance, casual.
  • * 1859 , (Charles Dickens), (A Tale of Two Cities)'', ch. VI, ''The Shoe Maker (Heron Book Centenial Edition)
  • No crowd was about the door; no people were discernible at any of the many windows; not even a chance passer-by was in the street. An unnatural silence and desertion reigned there.

    References

    * *

    Statistics

    * 1000 English basic words ----