Chance vs Occasion - What's the difference?

chance | occasion |


As nouns the difference between chance and occasion

is that chance is (countable) an opportunity or possibility while occasion is a favorable opportunity; a convenient or timely chance.

As verbs the difference between chance and occasion

is that chance is (archaic|intransitive) to happen by chance, to occur while occasion is to give occasion to; to cause; to produce; to induce; as, to occasion anxiety.

As a adjective chance

is (rare) happening]] by [[#noun|chance, casual.

chance

English

Alternative forms

* chaunce (obsolete)

Noun

(en noun)
  • (countable) An opportunity or possibility.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=2 , passage=Here was my chance . I took the old man aside, and two or three glasses of Old Crow launched him into reminiscence.}}
  • (uncountable) Random occurrence; luck.
  • (countable) The probability of something happening.
  • Derived terms

    (Terms derived from the noun "chance") * Buckley's chance * by chance * chance'd be a fine thing * chance fracture * chance-medley * chancer * chances are * chancy * Chinaman's chance * dog's chance * even chance * fair chance * fat chance * fighting chance * first-chance exception * game of chance * half a chance * happy chance * in with a chance * jump at the chance * last chance * last chance saloon * main chance * mum chance * not a chance * off chance/off-chance * outside chance * perchance * slim chance * smart chance * snowball's chance * snowball's chance in hell * sporting chance * stand a chance

    Verb

    (chanc)
  • (archaic) To happen by chance, to occur.
  • It chanced that I found a solution the very next day.
  • * Bible, Deuteronomy xxii. 6
  • if a bird's nest chance to be before thee
  • * Shakespeare
  • I chanced on this letter.
  • * 1843 , (Thomas Carlyle), '', book 2, ch. XV, ''Practical — Devotional
  • Once it chanced that Geoffrey Riddell (Bishop of Ely), a Prelate rather troublesome to (w), made a request of him for timber from his woods towards certain edifices going on at (Glemsford).
  • * 1847 , , (Jane Eyre), Chapter XVIII
  • Mr. Mason, shivering as some one chanced to open the door, asked for more coal to be put on the fire, which had burnt out its flame, though its mass of cinder still shone hot and red. The footman who brought the coal, in going out, stopped near Mr. Eshton's chair, and said something to him in a low voice, of which I heard only the words, "old woman,"—"quite troublesome."
  • (archaic) To befall; to happen to.
  • * 1826 , William Lambarde, A Perambulation of Kent
  • To try or risk.
  • Shall we carry the umbrella, or chance a rainstorm?
  • * W. D. Howells
  • Come what will, I will chance it.
  • To discover something by chance.
  • He chanced upon a kindly stranger who showed him the way.

    Derived terms

    * (l) * * (l)

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (rare) Happening]] by [[#Noun, chance, casual.
  • * 1859 , (Charles Dickens), (A Tale of Two Cities)'', ch. VI, ''The Shoe Maker (Heron Book Centenial Edition)
  • No crowd was about the door; no people were discernible at any of the many windows; not even a chance passer-by was in the street. An unnatural silence and desertion reigned there.

    References

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    Statistics

    * 1000 English basic words ----

    occasion

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A favorable opportunity; a convenient or timely chance.
  • * Bible, Rom. vii. 11
  • Sin, taking occasion by the commandment, deceived me.
  • * Waller
  • I'll take the occasion which he gives to bring / Him to his death.
  • The time when something happens.
  • *, chapter=13
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=And Vickers launched forth into a tirade very different from his platform utterances. He spoke with extreme contempt of the dense stupidity exhibited on all occasions by the working classes. He said that if you wanted to do anything for them, you must rule them, not pamper them.}}
  • An occurrence or state of affairs which causes some event or reaction; a motive or reason.
  • Something which causes something else; a cause.
  • * 1624 , John Smith, Generall Historie , in Kupperman 1988, p. 130:
  • it were too vile to say, and scarce to be beleeved, what we endured: but the occasion was our owne, for want of providence, industrie and government [...].
  • (obsolete) An occurrence or incident.
  • A particular happening; an instance or time when something occurred.
  • *{{quote-news, year=2013, date=April 9, author=Andrei Lankov, title=Stay Cool. Call North Korea’s Bluff., work=New York Times citation
  • , passage=In the last two decades, North Korea has on various occasions conducted highly provocative missile and nuclear tests and promised to turn Seoul into a sea of fire. }}
  • Need; requirement, necessity.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=2 , passage=I had occasion […] to make a somewhat long business trip to Chicago, and on my return […] I found Farrar awaiting me in the railway station. He smiled his wonted fraction by way of greeting, […], and finally leading me to his buggy, turned and drove out of town. I was completely mystified at such an unusual proceeding.}}
  • * Jeremy Taylor
  • after we have served ourselves and our own occasions
  • * Burke
  • when my occasions took me into France
  • A special event or function.
  • A reason or excuse; a motive; a persuasion.
  • * Spenser
  • Whose manner was, all passengers to stay, / And entertain with her occasions sly.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To give occasion to; to cause; to produce; to induce; as, to occasion anxiety.
  • it is seen that the mental changes are occasioned by a change of polarity

    Statistics

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