Host vs Chairman - What's the difference?

host | chairman |


As nouns the difference between host and chairman

is that host is autumn (season) while chairman is a person (implied male) presiding over a meeting.

host

English

Alternative forms

* hoast (obsolete)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) oste (French: . Used in English since 13th century.

Noun

(en noun)
  • One which receives or entertains a guest, socially, commercially, or officially.
  • * (and other bibliographic particulars) (Shakespeare)
  • Time is like a fashionable host , / That slightly shakes his parting guest by the hand.
  • One that provides a facility for an event.
  • A person or organization responsible for running an event.
  • A moderator or master of ceremonies for a performance.
  • (computing, Internet) A in a network.
  • (computing, Internet) Any computer attached to a network.
  • (biology) A cell or organism which harbors another organism or biological entity, usually a parasite.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= Katie L. Burke
  • , title= In the News , volume=101, issue=3, page=193, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Bats host many high-profile viruses that can infect humans, including severe acute respiratory syndrome and Ebola. A recent study explored the ecological variables that may contribute to bats’ propensity to harbor such zoonotic diseases by comparing them with another order of common reservoir hosts : rodents.}}
  • (evolutionism, genetics) An organism bearing certain genetic material.
  • Consecrated bread such as that used in the Christian ceremony of the Eucharist.
  • A paid male companion offering conversation and in some cases sex, as in certain types of bar in Japan.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To perform the role of a host.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= Katie L. Burke
  • , title= In the News , volume=101, issue=3, page=193, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Bats host many high-profile viruses that can infect humans, including severe acute respiratory syndrome and Ebola.}}
  • (obsolete) To lodge at an inn.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Where you shall host .
  • (computing, Internet) To run software made available to a remote user or process.
  • * 1987 May 7, Selden E. Ball, Jr., Re: Ethernet Terminal Concentrators'', comp.protocols.tcp-ip, ''Usenet
  • CMU/TEK TCP/IP software uses an excessive amount of cpu resources for terminal support both outbound, when accessing another system, and inbound, when the local system is hosting a session.

    See also

    * guest * event * master of ceremonies

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) hoste, from Middle (etyl) ), cognate with etymology 1.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A multitude of people arrayed as an army; used also in religious senses, as: Heavenly host (of angels)
  • * 1843 , (Thomas Carlyle), '', book 3, ch. X, ''Plugson of Undershot
  • Why, Plugson, even thy own host is all in mutiny: Cotton is conquered; but the ‘bare backs’ — are worse covered than ever!
  • * 2001 , Carlos Parada, Hesione 2 , Greek Mythology Link
  • the invading host that had sailed from Hellas in more than one thousand ships was of an unprecedented size.
  • A large number of items; a large inventory.
  • A host of parts for my Model A.
    Derived terms
    * heavenly host * Lord of Hosts

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) also oist, ost, from (etyl) hoiste, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (Catholicism) The consecrated bread or wafer of the Eucharist.
  • See also

    * hostage

    chairman

    Noun

    (chairmen)
  • A person (implied male) presiding over a meeting.
  • The head of a corporate or governmental board of directors, a committee, or other formal entity.
  • (historical) Someone whose job is to carry people in a portable chair, sedan chair, or similar conveyance.
  • * 1749 , Henry Fielding, Tom Jones , Folio Society 1973, p. 618:
  • Mr Western entered; but not before a small wrangling bout had passed between him and his chairmen ; for the fellows, who had taken up their burden at the Hercules Pillars, had conceived no hopes of having any future good customer in the squire [...]
  • * 1836 , Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers ?
  • Mr. Winkle, catching sight of a lady's face at the window of the sedan, turned hastily round, plied the knocker with all his might and main, and called frantically upon the chairman to take the chair away again.

    Usage notes

    Historically meant a man, now also used for women.

    Antonyms

    * chairwoman

    Hypernyms

    * chair, chairperson * presiding officer, presider