Stray vs Chaff - What's the difference?

stray | chaff |


In lang=en terms the difference between stray and chaff

is that stray is to cause to stray while chaff is to make fun of; to turn into ridicule by addressing in ironical or bantering language; to quiz.

As nouns the difference between stray and chaff

is that stray is any domestic animal that has an enclosure, or its proper place and company, and wanders at large, or is lost; an estray while chaff is the inedible parts of a grain-producing plant.

As verbs the difference between stray and chaff

is that stray is to wander, as from a direct course; to deviate, or go out of the way while chaff is to use light, idle language by way of fun or ridicule; to banter.

As an adjective stray

is having gone astray; strayed; wandering; as, a stray horse or sheep.

stray

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • Any domestic animal that has an enclosure, or its proper place and company, and wanders at large, or is lost; an estray.
  • (figuratively) One who is lost, either literally or metaphorically.
  • The act of wandering or going astray.
  • (historical) An area of common land or place administered for the use of general domestic animals, i.e. "the stray"
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To wander, as from a direct course; to deviate, or go out of the way.
  • * Denham
  • Thames among the wanton valleys strays .
  • To wander from company, or from the proper limits; to rove at large; to roam; to go astray.
  • (figurative) To wander from the path of duty or rectitude; to err.
  • * November 2 2014 , Daniel Taylor, " Sergio Agüero strike wins derby for Manchester City against 10-man United," guardian.co.uk
  • It was a derby that left Manchester United a long way back in Manchester City’s wing-mirrors and, in the worst moments, straying dangerously close to being their own worst enemy.
  • To cause to stray.
  • * 1591 , , V. i. 51:
  • Hath not else his eye / Strayed his affection in unlawful love,

    Synonyms

    * deviate

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Having gone astray; strayed; wandering; as, a stray horse or sheep.
  • In the wrong place; misplaced.
  • a stray comma

    Derived terms

    * stray line * stray mark

    References

    Anagrams

    * * *

    chaff

    English

    Noun

    (-)
  • The inedible parts of a grain-producing plant.
  • To separate out the chaff , early cultures tossed baskets of grain into the air and let the wind blow away the lighter chaff.
  • * Dryden
  • So take the corn and leave the chaff behind.
  • By extension, any excess or unwanted material, resource, or person; anything worthless.
  • There are plenty of good books on the subject, but take care to separate the wheat from the chaff .
  • * Shakespeare
  • the chaff and ruin of the times
  • Loose material dropped from aircraft specifically to interfere with radar detection.
  • Straw or hay cut up fine for the food of cattle.
  • * Wyatt
  • By adding chaff' to his corn, the horse must take more time to eat it. In this way ' chaff is very useful.
  • Light jesting talk; banter; raillery.
  • Derived terms

    * separate the wheat from the chaff

    See also

    * bran

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To use light, idle language by way of fun or ridicule; to banter.
  • To make fun of; to turn into ridicule by addressing in ironical or bantering language; to quiz.