Writ vs Cessor - What's the difference?

writ | cessor |


In legal|lang=en terms the difference between writ and cessor

is that writ is (legal) a written order, issued by a court, ordering someone to do (or stop doing) something while cessor is (legal) in english law, one who is dilatory, negligent, and delinquent in his duty or service, and who thereby incurred the danger of the law, and was liable to have the writ of cessavit brought against him.

In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between writ and cessor

is that writ is (obsolete) that which is written; writing while cessor is (obsolete) one who determined the amount of a cess; an assessor.

As nouns the difference between writ and cessor

is that writ is (legal) a written order, issued by a court, ordering someone to do (or stop doing) something while cessor is (legal) in english law, one who is dilatory, negligent, and delinquent in his duty or service, and who thereby incurred the danger of the law, and was liable to have the writ of cessavit brought against him.

As a verb writ

is (dated|nonstandard).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

writ

English

(wikipedia writ)

Noun

(en noun)
  • (legal) A written order, issued by a court, ordering someone to do (or stop doing) something.
  • authority, power to enforce compliance
  • * '>citation
  • We can't let them take advantage of the fact that there are so many areas of the world where no one's writ runs.
  • (obsolete) that which is written; writing
  • * Spenser
  • Then to his hands that writ he did betake, / Which he disclosing read, thus as the paper spake.
  • * Knolles
  • Babylon, so much spoken of in Holy Writ

    Derived terms

    * drop the writ * Holy Writ * writ of habeas corpus

    References

    * Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia (Webster)

    Verb

    (head)
  • (dated, nonstandard)
  • (Dryden)
  • * (Omar Khayyam) (in translation)
  • The moving finger writes, and having writ , not all your piety or wit can lure it back to cancel half a line

    Usage notes

    * The form writ'' survives in standard dialects only in the phrase ''writ large , though it remains common in some dialects (e.g. Scouse).

    cessor

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (legal) In English law, one who is dilatory, negligent, and delinquent in his duty or service, and who thereby incurred the danger of the law, and was liable to have the writ of cessavit brought against him.
  • (obsolete) One who determined the amount of a cess; an assessor.
  • References

    (1728) ----