Incurred vs Cessor - What's the difference?

incurred | cessor |


As a verb incurred

is (incur).

As a noun cessor is

(legal) in english law, one who is dilatory, negligent, and delinquent in his duty or service, and who thereby incurred the danger of the law, and was liable to have the writ of cessavit brought against him.

incurred

English

Verb

(head)
  • (incur)

  • incur

    English

    Alternative forms

    * encur

    Verb

    (incurr)
  • To bring upon oneself or expose oneself to, especially something inconvenient, harmful, or onerous; to become liable or subject to.
  • * 1891 , Henry Graham Dakyns (translator), The works of Xenophon , ",
  • [T]he master in his wrath may easily incur worse evil himself than he inflicts—[...]
  • * 1910 , ,
  • And here it is to be noted that hatred is incurred as well on account of good actions as of bad;
  • (chiefly, legal) To render somebody liable or subject to.
  • * 1861 , ,
  • The least neglect of duty will incur [...] the penalty of thirty-nine well laid on in the morning.
  • (obsolete) To enter or pass into.
  • (obsolete) To fall within a period or scope; to occur; to run into danger.
  • To render liable or subject to; to occasion.
  • * Chapman
  • Lest you incur me much more damage in my fame than you have done me pleasure in preserving my life.

    Synonyms

    * (To bring down or expose oneself to) encounter, contract * (render liable or subject to) occasion

    Anagrams

    *

    cessor

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (legal) In English law, one who is dilatory, negligent, and delinquent in his duty or service, and who thereby incurred the danger of the law, and was liable to have the writ of cessavit brought against him.
  • (obsolete) One who determined the amount of a cess; an assessor.
  • References

    (1728) ----