Dilatory vs Cessor - What's the difference?

dilatory | cessor |


As an adjective dilatory

is intentionally delaying (someone or something), intended to cause delay, gain time, or defer decision.

As a noun cessor is

(legal) in english law, one who is dilatory, negligent, and delinquent in his duty or service, and who thereby incurred the danger of the law, and was liable to have the writ of cessavit brought against him.

dilatory

English

Adjective

(-)
  • Intentionally delaying (someone or something), intended to cause delay, gain time, or defer decision.
  • a dilatory strategy
  • * Motley
  • Alva, as usual, brought his dilatory policy to bear upon his adversary.
  • Slow or tardy.
  • Derived terms

    * dilatorily * dilatoriness

    Anagrams

    * adroitly * idolatry

    cessor

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (legal) In English law, one who is dilatory, negligent, and delinquent in his duty or service, and who thereby incurred the danger of the law, and was liable to have the writ of cessavit brought against him.
  • (obsolete) One who determined the amount of a cess; an assessor.
  • References

    (1728) ----