Caul vs Caut - What's the difference?

caul | caut |


As a noun caul

is (historical) a style of close-fitting circular cap worn by women in the sixteenth century and later, often made of linen.

As a verb caut is

(obsolete|done by a panther) emit a call in the manner of a panther.

caul

English

(wikipedia caul)

Alternative forms

* call

Noun

(en noun)
  • (historical) A style of close-fitting circular cap worn by women in the sixteenth century and later, often made of linen.
  • * 1590 , Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene , I.vii:
  • Ne spared they to strip her naked all. / Then when they had despoild her tire and call , / Such as she was, their eyes might her behold
  • The thin membrane which covers the lower intestines; the omentum.
  • The amnion which encloses the foetus before birth, especially that part of it which sometimes shrouds a baby’s head at birth (traditionally considered to be good luck).
  • * 1971 , , Religion and the Decline of Magic , Folio Society (2012), page 182:
  • Even in the mid seventeenth century a country gentleman might regard his caul as a treasure to be preserved with great care, and bequeathed to his descendants.
  • The surface of a press that makes contact with panel product, especially a removable plate or sheet.
  • (woodworking) A strip or block of wood used to distribute or direct clamping force.
  • (culinary) (Caul fat).
  • Anagrams

    * * *

    caut

    English

    Verb

  • (obsolete, done by a panther) Emit a call in the manner of a panther.
  • * 1688 , Randle Holme, The Academy of Armory, or A Storehouse of Armory and Blazon , volume 2, page 134, column 2
  • A Panther Cauteth, which word is taken from the sound of his voice.
  • (obsolete) (in figurative extension)
  • * 1722 May 2nd, Ebenezer Elliston, “The La?t Speech and Dying Words of Ebenezer Elli?ton” in Mi?cellanies (ed. Jonathan Swift, pub. 1751, volume nine, fifth edition), pages 19–20
  • If I have done Service to Men in what I have ?aid, I ?hall hope I have done Service to God; and that will be better than a ?illy Speech made for me, full of whining and cauting, which I utterly de?pi?e, and have never been u?ed to; yet ?uch a one I expect to have my Ears tormented with, as I am pa??ing along the Streets[.]

    References

    * “ †caut, v.'']” listed in the '' [2nd ed., 1989 ----