Cause vs Crank - What's the difference?

cause | crank |


In context|obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between cause and crank

is that cause is (obsolete) any subject of discussion or debate; a matter; an affair while crank is (obsolete) a sick person; an invalid.

As nouns the difference between cause and crank

is that cause is the source of, or reason for, an event or action; that which produces or effects a result while crank is a bent piece of an axle or shaft, or an attached arm perpendicular, or nearly so, to the end of a shaft or wheel, used to impart a rotation to a wheel or other mechanical device; also used to change circular into reciprocating motion, or reciprocating into circular motion.

As verbs the difference between cause and crank

is that cause is to set off an event or action while crank is to turn by means of a crank .

As a adjective crank is

(slang) strange, weird, odd.

cause

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • The source of, or reason for, an event or action; that which produces or effects a result.
  • Her wedding will be cause for celebration.
    They identified a burst pipe as the cause of the flooding.
  • * , chapter=5
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=He was thinking; but the glory of the song, the swell from the great organ, the clustered lights, […], the height and vastness of this noble fane, its antiquity and its strength—all these things seemed to have their part as causes of the thrilling emotion that accompanied his thoughts.}}
  • A goal, aim or principle, especially one which transcends purely selfish ends.
  • * Shakespeare
  • God befriend us, as our cause is just.
  • * Burke
  • The part they take against me is from zeal to the cause .
  • (obsolete) Sake; interest; advantage.
  • * Bible, 2 Corinthians vii. 12
  • I did it not for his cause .
  • (obsolete) Any subject of discussion or debate; a matter; an affair.
  • * Shakespeare
  • What counsel give you in this weighty cause ?
  • (legal) A suit or action in court; any legal process by which a party endeavors to obtain his claim, or what he regards as his right; case; ground of action.
  • Synonyms

    * (source or reason) reason, source

    Derived terms

    * because * causal * causality * causative * cause celebre * efficient cause * final cause * for cause (law) * formal cause * material cause

    See also

    * effect

    Verb

    (caus)
  • To set off an event or action.
  • *
  • Serene, smiling, enigmatic, she faced him with no fear whatever showing in her dark eyes.She put back a truant curl from her forehead where it had sought egress to the world, and looked him full in the face now, drawing a deep breath which caused the round of her bosom to lift the lace at her throat.
  • * {{quote-magazine, title=A better waterworks, date=2013-06-01, volume=407, issue=8838
  • , page=5 (Technology Quarterly), magazine=(The Economist) citation , passage=An artificial kidney these days still means a refrigerator-sized dialysis machine. Such devices mimic
  • To actively produce as a result, by means of force or authority.
  • * Bible, (w) vii.4
  • I will cause it to rain upon the earth forty days.
  • * , chapter=13
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=And Vickers launched forth into a tirade very different from his platform utterances. He spoke with extreme contempt of the dense stupidity exhibited on all occasions by the working classes. He said that if you wanted to do anything for them, you must rule them, not pamper them. Soft heartedness caused more harm than good.}}
  • To assign or show cause; to give a reason; to make excuse.
  • (Spenser)

    Derived terms

    * causation

    Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * English control verbs ----

    crank

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • (slang) strange, weird, odd
  • sick; unwell; infirm
  • (nautical, of a ship) Liable to capsize because of poorly stowed cargo or insufficient ballast
  • Full of spirit; brisk; lively; sprightly; overconfident; opinionated.
  • * Udall
  • He who was, a little before, bedrid, was now crank and lusty.
  • * Mrs. Stowe
  • If you strong electioners did not think you were among the elect, you would not be so crank about it.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A bent piece of an axle or shaft, or an attached arm perpendicular, or nearly so, to the end of a shaft or wheel, used to impart a rotation to a wheel or other mechanical device; also used to change circular into reciprocating motion, or reciprocating into circular motion.(rfex)
  • The act of converting power into motion, by turning a crankshaft.
  • Yes, a crank was all it needed to start .
  • (archaic) Any bend, turn, or winding, as of a passage.
  • * (rfdate) Spenser:
  • So many turning cranks these have, so many crooks.
  • (informal) An ill-tempered or nasty person
  • Billy-Bob is a nasty old crank ! He chased my cat away.
  • A twist or turn of the mind; caprice; whim; crotchet; also, a fit of temper or passion.
  • * Carlyle
  • Violent of temper; subject to sudden cranks .
  • (informal, British, dated in US) A person who is considered strange or odd by others. They may behave in unconventional ways.
  • John is a crank because he talks to himself .
  • * 1882 January 14, in Pall Mall Gazette :
  • Persons whom the Americans since Guiteau's trial have begun to designate as ‘cranks’ —that is to say, persons of disordered mind, in whom the itch of notoriety supplies the lack of any higher ambition.
  • (informal) An advocate of a pseudoscience movement.
  • That crank next door thinks he's created cold fusion in his garage.
  • (US, slang) methamphetamine.
  • Danny got abscesses from shooting all that bathtub crank .
  • (rare) A twist or turn in speech; a conceit consisting in a change of the form or meaning of a word.
  • * (rfdate) Milton:
  • Quips, and cranks , and wanton wiles.
  • (obsolete) A sick person; an invalid.
  • * Burton
  • Thou art a counterfeit crank , a cheater.
  • (slang) penis.
  • * 2013 , Reggie Chesterfield, Scoundrel (page 57)
  • It was going to be hard not to blow with a girl like her sucking on his crank .

    Synonyms

    * See also .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To turn by means of a crank .
  • Motorists had to crank their engine by hand.
  • To turn a crank .
  • He's been cranking all day and yet it refuses to crank.
  • To turn.
  • He's been cranking all day and yet it refuses to crank .
  • To cause to spin via other means, as though turned by a crank.
  • I turn the key and crank the engine; yet it doesn't turn over
    Crank it up!
  • To act in a cranky manner; to behave unreasonably and irritably, especially through complaining.
  • Quit cranking about your spilt milk!
  • To be running at a high level of output or effort.
  • By one hour into the shift, the boys were really cranking .
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • (dated) To run with a winding course; to double; to crook; to wind and turn.
  • * (rfdate) :
  • See how this river comes me cranking in.

    Derived terms

    * crank axle * crank call * crankcase * crank out * crankpin * crank pin * crank shaft * crankstart * crank start * crank up * crank wheel * cranky * turn someone's crank