Committee vs Caucus - What's the difference?

committee | caucus |


As nouns the difference between committee and caucus

is that committee is a group of persons convened for the accomplishment of some specific purpose, typically with formal protocols while caucus is (us) a meeting, especially a preliminary meeting, of persons belonging to a party, to nominate candidates for public office, or to select delegates to a nominating convention, or to confer regarding measures of party policy; a political primary meeting.

As a verb caucus is

(us) to meet and participate in caucus.

committee

English

Alternative forms

* (contraction)

Noun

(wikipedia committee) (en noun)
  • a group of persons convened for the accomplishment of some specific purpose, typically with formal protocols
  • (archaic) a guardian; someone in charge of another person deemed to be unable to look after himself or herself.
  • Derived terms

    * committeeman * committeeperson * committeewoman * subcommittee

    caucus

    English

    Noun

    (es)
  • (US) A meeting, especially a preliminary meeting, of persons belonging to a party, to nominate candidates for public office, or to select delegates to a nominating convention, or to confer regarding measures of party policy; a political primary meeting.
  • (US, Canada) A grouping of all the members of a legislature from the same party.
  • Derived terms

    * caucus race

    Verb

    (es)
  • (US) To meet and participate in caucus.
  • * 2006 , Associated Press, (reprinted in the Boston Globe) [http://www.boston.com/news/nation/washington/articles/2006/11/13/lieberman_wont_rule_out_gop_caucusing/], November 13,
  • "Senator Joseph I. Lieberman of Connecticut said yesterday that he will caucus with Senate Democrats in the new Congress, but he would not rule out switching to the Republican caucus if he starts to feel uncomfortable among Democrats."

    See also

    * (wikipedia)

    References

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