Cathode vs Cathodal - What's the difference?

cathode | cathodal |


As a noun cathode

is (electricity) an electrode, of a cell or other electrically polarized device, through which a current of electricity flows inwards (and thus, electrons flow outwards) it usually, but not always, has a negative voltage.

As an adjective cathodal is

(biochemistry) attracted towards a cathode.

cathode

English

Alternative forms

* (l)

Noun

(wikipedia cathode) (en noun)
  • (electricity) An electrode, of a cell or other electrically polarized device, through which a current of electricity flows inwards (and thus, electrons flow outwards). It usually, but not always, has a negative voltage.
  • (chemistry, by extension) The electrode at which chemical reduction of cations takes place, usually resulting in the deposition of metal onto the electrode.
  • (electronics) The electrode from which electrons are emitted into a .
  • (electronics) That electrode of a semiconductor device which is connected to the n-type material of a p-n junction.
  • Coordinate terms

    * (l)

    Derived terms

    * (l) * (l) * (l)

    cathodal

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (biochemistry) Attracted towards a cathode