yearn

Yearn vs Discontent - What's the difference?

yearn | discontent |


As verbs the difference between yearn and discontent

is that yearn is to long, have a strong desire (for something) or yearn can be (scotland) to curdle, as milk while discontent is to deprive of contentment; to make uneasy; to dissatisfy.

As a noun discontent is

dissatisfaction.

As an adjective discontent is

not content; discontented; dissatisfied.

Yell vs Yearn - What's the difference?

yell | yearn |


In lang=en terms the difference between yell and yearn

is that yell is to convey by shouting while yearn is to pain; to grieve; to vex.

As verbs the difference between yell and yearn

is that yell is shout; holler; make a loud sound with the voice while yearn is to long, have a strong desire (for something) or yearn can be (scotland) to curdle, as milk.

As a noun yell

is a shout.

As an adjective yell

is (ulster) dry (of cow).

Aspiration vs Yearn - What's the difference?

aspiration | yearn |


As a noun aspiration

is aspiration (burst of air that follows the release of some consonants).

As a verb yearn is

to long, have a strong desire (for something) or yearn can be (scotland) to curdle, as milk.

Yearn vs Shout - What's the difference?

yearn | shout |


In lang=en terms the difference between yearn and shout

is that yearn is to pain; to grieve; to vex while shout is to utter with a shout; to cry; -- sometimes with out; as, to shout, or to shout out, a man's name.

As verbs the difference between yearn and shout

is that yearn is to long, have a strong desire (for something) or yearn can be (scotland) to curdle, as milk while shout is to utter a sudden and loud outcry, as in joy, triumph, or exultation, or to attract attention, to animate soldiers, etc.

As a noun shout is

a loud burst of voice or voices; a vehement and sudden outcry, especially that of a multitude expressing joy, triumph, exultation, or animated courage.

Yearn vs Love - What's the difference?

yearn | love |


As a verb yearn

is to long, have a strong desire (for something) or yearn can be (scotland) to curdle, as milk.

As a noun love is

money.

Yearn vs Strive - What's the difference?

yearn | strive |


As verbs the difference between yearn and strive

is that yearn is to long, have a strong desire (for something) or yearn can be (scotland) to curdle, as milk while strive is to try to achieve a result; to make strenuous effort; to try earnestly and persistently.

As a noun strive is

(obsolete) an effort; a striving.

Yearn vs Pant - What's the difference?

yearn | pant |


In lang=en terms the difference between yearn and pant

is that yearn is to pain; to grieve; to vex while pant is to sigh; to flutter; to languish.

As verbs the difference between yearn and pant

is that yearn is to long, have a strong desire (for something) or yearn can be (scotland) to curdle, as milk while pant is (ambitransitive) to breathe quickly or in a labored manner, as after exertion or from eagerness or excitement; to respire with heaving of the breast; to gasp.

As a noun pant is

a quick breathing; a catching of the breath; a gasp or pant can be (fashion) a pair of pants (trousers or underpants) or pant can be a public drinking fountain in scotland and north-east england.

Yearn vs Keen - What's the difference?

yearn | keen |


In lang=en terms the difference between yearn and keen

is that yearn is to pain; to grieve; to vex while keen is to mourn.

As verbs the difference between yearn and keen

is that yearn is to long, have a strong desire (for something) or yearn can be (scotland) to curdle, as milk while keen is (rare) to sharpen; to make cold or keen can be to utter a keen.

As an adjective keen is

showing a quick and ardent willingness or responsiveness, enthusiastic, eager; interested, intense.

As a noun keen is

a prolonged wail for a deceased person.

Yearn vs Moan - What's the difference?

yearn | moan |


As a verb yearn

is to long, have a strong desire (for something) or yearn can be (scotland) to curdle, as milk.

As a proper noun moan is

anglesey.

Sigh vs Yearn - What's the difference?

sigh | yearn |


In lang=en terms the difference between sigh and yearn

is that sigh is to express by sighs; to utter in or with sighs while yearn is to pain; to grieve; to vex.

As verbs the difference between sigh and yearn

is that sigh is to inhale a larger quantity of air than usual, and immediately expel it; to make a deep single audible respiration, especially as the result or involuntary expression of fatigue, exhaustion, grief, sorrow, frustration, or the like while yearn is to long, have a strong desire (for something) or yearn can be (scotland) to curdle, as milk.

As a noun sigh

is a deep and prolonged audible inspiration or respiration of air, as when fatigued, frustrated, grieved, or relieved; the act of sighing.

As an interjection sigh

is an expression of fatigue, exhaustion, grief, sorrow, frustration, or the like, often used in casual written contexts.

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