walkabout

Celebrity vs Walkabout - What's the difference?

celebrity | walkabout |


As nouns the difference between celebrity and walkabout

is that celebrity is (label) a rite or ceremony while walkabout is (australian aboriginal) a nomadic excursion into the bush, especially one taken by young teenage boys in certain ancient-custom honoring tribes.

Stroll vs Walkabout - What's the difference?

stroll | walkabout |


As nouns the difference between stroll and walkabout

is that stroll is a wandering on foot; an idle and leisurely walk; a ramble while walkabout is (australian aboriginal) a nomadic excursion into the bush, especially one taken by young teenage boys in certain ancient-custom honoring tribes.

As a verb stroll

is to wander on foot; to ramble idly or leisurely; to rove.

Trip vs Walkabout - What's the difference?

trip | walkabout |


As nouns the difference between trip and walkabout

is that trip is a journey; an excursion or jaunt while walkabout is (australian aboriginal) a nomadic excursion into the bush, especially one taken by young teenage boys in certain ancient-custom honoring tribes.

As a verb trip

is to fall over or stumble over an object as a result of striking it with one's foot.

As a adjective trip

is (poker slang) of or relating to.

Public vs Walkabout - What's the difference?

public | walkabout |


As nouns the difference between public and walkabout

is that public is the people in general, regardless of membership of any particular group while walkabout is (australian aboriginal) a nomadic excursion into the bush, especially one taken by young teenage boys in certain ancient-custom honoring tribes.

As a adjective public

is able to be seen or known by everyone; open to general view, happening without concealment.

Walking vs Walkabout - What's the difference?

walking | walkabout |


As nouns the difference between walking and walkabout

is that walking is while walkabout is (australian aboriginal) a nomadic excursion into the bush, especially one taken by young teenage boys in certain ancient-custom honoring tribes.

As a verb walking

is .

As a adjective walking

is as a human; living.

Bush vs Walkabout - What's the difference?

bush | walkabout |


As nouns the difference between bush and walkabout

is that bush is (horticulture) a woody plant distinguished from a tree by its multiple stems and lower height, being usually less than six metres tall; a horticultural rather than strictly botanical category or bush can be (archaic) a tavern or wine merchant or bush can be rural areas, typically remote, wooded, undeveloped and uncultivated or bush can be (baseball) amateurish behavior, short for "bush league behavior" or bush can be a thick washer or hollow cylinder of metal (also bushing) while walkabout is (australian aboriginal) a nomadic excursion into the bush, especially one taken by young teenage boys in certain ancient-custom honoring tribes.

As a verb bush

is to branch thickly in the manner of a bush or bush can be to furnish with a bush or lining.

As a adjective bush

is the noun "bush", used attributively or bush can be (colloquial) not skilled; not professional; not major league.

As a adverb bush

is (australia) towards the direction of the outback.

Excursion vs Walkabout - What's the difference?

excursion | walkabout |


As nouns the difference between excursion and walkabout

is that excursion is a brief recreational trip; a journey out of the usual way while walkabout is (australian aboriginal) a nomadic excursion into the bush, especially one taken by young teenage boys in certain ancient-custom honoring tribes.

Nomadic vs Walkabout - What's the difference?

nomadic | walkabout |


As a adjective nomadic

is of, or relating to nomads.

As a noun walkabout is

(australian aboriginal) a nomadic excursion into the bush, especially one taken by young teenage boys in certain ancient-custom honoring tribes.

What is the difference between walkabout and about?

walkabout | about | Derived terms |

Walkabout is a derived term of about.


As a noun walkabout

is {{context|australian aboriginal|lang=en}} a nomadic excursion into the bush, especially one taken by young teenage boys in certain ancient-custom honoring tribes.

As a preposition about is

in a circle around; all round; on every side of; on the outside of {{defdate|first attested prior to 1150}}.

As a adverb about is

on all sides; around {{defdate|first attested prior to 1150}}.

As a adjective about is

moving around; astir.

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