tug

Tug vs Cruiser - What's the difference?

tug | cruiser |


In nautical|lang=en terms the difference between tug and cruiser

is that tug is (nautical) a tugboat while cruiser is (nautical) any of several yachts designed for cruising.

As nouns the difference between tug and cruiser

is that tug is a sudden powerful pull while cruiser is (nautical|in the days of sail) a frigate or other vessel, detached from the fleet, to cruise independently in search of the enemy or its merchant ships.

As a verb tug

is to pull or drag with great effort.

Tug vs Grab - What's the difference?

tug | grab | Related terms |

Tug is a related term of grab.


As nouns the difference between tug and grab

is that tug is a sudden powerful pull while grab is grave.

As a verb tug

is to pull or drag with great effort.

Tug vs Reflex - What's the difference?

tug | reflex | Related terms |

Tug is a related term of reflex.


In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between tug and reflex

is that tug is (obsolete) a kind of vehicle used for conveying timber and heavy articles while reflex is (obsolete) reflection; the light reflected from an illuminated surface to one in shade.

As verbs the difference between tug and reflex

is that tug is to pull or drag with great effort while reflex is to bend, turn back or reflect.

As nouns the difference between tug and reflex

is that tug is a sudden powerful pull while reflex is an automatic response to a simple stimulus which does not require mental processing.

As an adjective reflex is

bent, turned back or reflected.

Tug vs Spasm - What's the difference?

tug | spasm | Related terms |

Tug is a related term of spasm.


As verbs the difference between tug and spasm

is that tug is to pull or drag with great effort while spasm is to produce and undergo a.

As nouns the difference between tug and spasm

is that tug is a sudden powerful pull while spasm is a sudden, involuntary contraction of a muscle, a group of muscles, or a hollow organ.

Tug vs Convulse - What's the difference?

tug | convulse | Related terms |

Tug is a related term of convulse.


As verbs the difference between tug and convulse

is that tug is to pull or drag with great effort while convulse is .

As a noun tug

is a sudden powerful pull.

As an adjective convulse is

convulsed.

Tug vs Thrust - What's the difference?

tug | thrust | Related terms |

Tug is a related term of thrust.


As verbs the difference between tug and thrust

is that tug is to pull or drag with great effort while thrust is (lb) to make advance with.

As nouns the difference between tug and thrust

is that tug is a sudden powerful pull while thrust is (fencing) an attack made by moving the sword parallel to its length and landing with the point.

Tug vs Toe - What's the difference?

tug | toe |


As a verb tug

is to pull or drag with great effort.

As a noun tug

is a sudden powerful pull.

As a pronoun toe is

.

Tug vs Squeeze - What's the difference?

tug | squeeze |


In lang=en terms the difference between tug and squeeze

is that tug is to tow by tugboat while squeeze is to put in a difficult position by presenting two or more choices.

In slang|lang=en terms the difference between tug and squeeze

is that tug is (slang) an act of masturbation while squeeze is (slang) a romantic partner.

As verbs the difference between tug and squeeze

is that tug is to pull or drag with great effort while squeeze is to apply pressure to from two or more sides at once.

As nouns the difference between tug and squeeze

is that tug is a sudden powerful pull while squeeze is a difficult position.

Trail vs Tug - What's the difference?

trail | tug |


As a proper noun trail

is a city in british columbia.

As a verb tug is

to pull or drag with great effort.

As a noun tug is

a sudden powerful pull.

Tug vs Tagged - What's the difference?

tug | tagged |


As verbs the difference between tug and tagged

is that tug is to pull or drag with great effort while tagged is (tag).

As a noun tug

is a sudden powerful pull.

As an adjective tagged is

having a tag; labeled.

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