trickle

Toddle vs Trickle - What's the difference?

toddle | trickle |


As verbs the difference between toddle and trickle

is that toddle is to walk unsteadily, as a small child does while trickle is to pour a liquid in a very thin stream, or so that drops fall continuously.

As a noun trickle is

a very thin river.

Trickle vs Little - What's the difference?

trickle | little |


As a noun trickle

is a very thin river.

As a verb trickle

is to pour a liquid in a very thin stream, or so that drops fall continuously.

As a proper noun little is

.

Trickle vs Peter - What's the difference?

trickle | peter |


As nouns the difference between trickle and peter

is that trickle is a very thin river while peter is (hypocoristic slang ) the penis.

As verbs the difference between trickle and peter

is that trickle is to pour a liquid in a very thin stream, or so that drops fall continuously while peter is (most often used in the phrase peter out) to dwindle; to trail off; to diminish to nothing.

Trickle vs Flash - What's the difference?

trickle | flash |


As a noun trickle

is a very thin river.

As a verb trickle

is to pour a liquid in a very thin stream, or so that drops fall continuously.

As a proper noun flash is

(computing) a popular multimedia platform, most often used for adding animation and interactivity to webpages.

Trickle vs Floe - What's the difference?

trickle | floe |


As nouns the difference between trickle and floe

is that trickle is a very thin river while floe is a low, flat mass of floating ice.

As a verb trickle

is to pour a liquid in a very thin stream, or so that drops fall continuously.

Trickle vs Gusher - What's the difference?

trickle | gusher |


As nouns the difference between trickle and gusher

is that trickle is a very thin river while gusher is one that gushes.

As a verb trickle

is to pour a liquid in a very thin stream, or so that drops fall continuously.

Trickle vs Drench - What's the difference?

trickle | drench |


As nouns the difference between trickle and drench

is that trickle is a very thin river while drench is a draught administered to an animal or drench can be (obsolete|uk) a military vassal, mentioned in the domesday book.

As verbs the difference between trickle and drench

is that trickle is to pour a liquid in a very thin stream, or so that drops fall continuously while drench is to soak, to make very wet.

Deluge vs Trickle - What's the difference?

deluge | trickle |


As a proper noun deluge

is .

As a noun trickle is

.

As a verb trickle is

.

Creek vs Trickle - What's the difference?

creek | trickle |


As nouns the difference between creek and trickle

is that creek is one of a native american tribe from the southeastern united states while trickle is a very thin river.

As a proper noun creek

is the muskogean language of the creek tribe.

As an adjective creek

is of or pertaining to the creek tribe.

As a verb trickle is

to pour a liquid in a very thin stream, or so that drops fall continuously.

Inject vs Trickle - What's the difference?

inject | trickle |


In lang=en terms the difference between inject and trickle

is that inject is to take or be administered something by means of injection, especially medicine or drugs while trickle is to move or roll slowly.

As verbs the difference between inject and trickle

is that inject is to push or pump (something, especially fluids) into a cavity or passage while trickle is to pour a liquid in a very thin stream, or so that drops fall continuously.

As a noun trickle is

a very thin river.

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