took

Took vs Toom - What's the difference?

took | toom |


As verbs the difference between took and toom

is that took is (take) while toom is (rare|or|dialectal) to empty; teem.

As an adjective toom is

(rare|or|dialectal|northern england|scotland) empty.

As a noun toom is

(chiefly scottish) a piece of waste ground where rubbish is shot or toom can be vacant time, leisure.

Took vs Stook - What's the difference?

took | stook |


As verbs the difference between took and stook

is that took is (take) while stook is (agriculture) to make stooks.

As a noun stook is

a pile or bundle, especially of straw.

Took vs Tonk - What's the difference?

took | tonk |


As verbs the difference between took and tonk

is that took is (take) while tonk is form of obsolete verb (to be wrong with ) only one form is still in use today:.

Took vs Kook - What's the difference?

took | kook |


As a verb took

is (take).

As a noun kook is

kitchen.

Took vs Nook - What's the difference?

took | nook |


As a verb took

is (take).

As a noun nook is

a small corner formed by two walls; an alcove or recess or ancone.

Took vs Toon - What's the difference?

took | toon |


As a verb took

is (take).

As a proper noun toon is

(geordie) the city of newcastle upon tyne.

Took vs Toot - What's the difference?

took | toot |


As a verb took

is (take).

As an interjection toot is

honk.

Took vs Gook - What's the difference?

took | gook |


As a verb took

is (take).

As a noun gook is

(slang|vulgar|pejorative|offensive|ethnic slur) a person from the far east, oceania or southeast asia, in particular a vietnamese, filipino, chinese, korean person or gook can be (informal) grime or mud.

Took vs Ook - What's the difference?

took | ook |


As a verb took

is (take).

As an interjection ook is

the cry of a monkey.

Took vs Hook - What's the difference?

took | hook |


As verbs the difference between took and hook

is that took is (take) while hook is to attach a hook to.

As a noun hook is

a rod bent into a curved shape, typically with one end free and the other end secured to a rope or other attachment.

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