tiller

Tiller vs Ryot - What's the difference?

tiller | ryot |


As nouns the difference between tiller and ryot

is that tiller is a person who tills; a farmer or tiller can be (obsolete) a young tree or tiller can be (archery) the stock; a beam on a crossbow carved to fit the arrow, or the point of balance in a longbow while ryot is a farmer or tiller of the soil.

As a verb tiller

is to put forth new shoots from the root or from around the bottom of the original stalk; stool.

Tiller vs Telltale - What's the difference?

tiller | telltale |


In context|nautical|lang=en terms the difference between tiller and telltale

is that tiller is (nautical) the handle of the rudder which the helmsman holds to steer the boat, a piece of wood or metal extending forward from the rudder over or through the transom generally attached at the top of the rudder while telltale is (nautical) a compass in the cabin of a vessel, usually placed where the captain can see it at all hours, and thus inform himself of the vessel's course.

As nouns the difference between tiller and telltale

is that tiller is a person who tills; a farmer or tiller can be (obsolete) a young tree or tiller can be (archery) the stock; a beam on a crossbow carved to fit the arrow, or the point of balance in a longbow while telltale is one who divulges private information with intent to hurt others.

As a verb tiller

is to put forth new shoots from the root or from around the bottom of the original stalk; stool.

As a adjective telltale is

revealing something not intended to be known.

Tiller vs Rudder - What's the difference?

tiller | rudder |


In context|nautical|lang=en terms the difference between tiller and rudder

is that tiller is (nautical) the handle of the rudder which the helmsman holds to steer the boat, a piece of wood or metal extending forward from the rudder over or through the transom generally attached at the top of the rudder while rudder is (nautical) an underwater vane used to steer a vessel the rudder is controlled by means of a wheel, tiller or other apparatus (modern vessels can be controlled even with a joystick or an autopilot).

As nouns the difference between tiller and rudder

is that tiller is a person who tills; a farmer or tiller can be (obsolete) a young tree or tiller can be (archery) the stock; a beam on a crossbow carved to fit the arrow, or the point of balance in a longbow while rudder is (nautical) an underwater vane used to steer a vessel the rudder is controlled by means of a wheel, tiller or other apparatus (modern vessels can be controlled even with a joystick or an autopilot).

As a verb tiller

is to put forth new shoots from the root or from around the bottom of the original stalk; stool.

Tiller vs Helm - What's the difference?

tiller | helm |


In context|nautical|lang=en terms the difference between tiller and helm

is that tiller is (nautical) the handle of the rudder which the helmsman holds to steer the boat, a piece of wood or metal extending forward from the rudder over or through the transom generally attached at the top of the rudder while helm is (nautical) the steering apparatus of a ship, especially the tiller or wheel.

As nouns the difference between tiller and helm

is that tiller is a person who tills; a farmer or tiller can be (obsolete) a young tree or tiller can be (archery) the stock; a beam on a crossbow carved to fit the arrow, or the point of balance in a longbow while helm is (nautical) the steering apparatus of a ship, especially the tiller or wheel or helm can be (archaic) a helmet.

As verbs the difference between tiller and helm

is that tiller is to put forth new shoots from the root or from around the bottom of the original stalk; stool while helm is to be a helmsman or a member of the helm; to be in charge of steering the boat.

What is the difference between tiller and husband?

tiller | husband |


In context|obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between tiller and husband

is that tiller is (obsolete) a young tree while husband is (obsolete) a tiller of the ground; a husbandman.

As nouns the difference between tiller and husband

is that tiller is a person who tills; a farmer or tiller can be (obsolete) a young tree or tiller can be (archery) the stock; a beam on a crossbow carved to fit the arrow, or the point of balance in a longbow while husband is (obsolete) the master of a house; the head of a family; a householder.

As verbs the difference between tiller and husband

is that tiller is to put forth new shoots from the root or from around the bottom of the original stalk; stool while husband is to manage or administer carefully and frugally; use to the best advantage; economise.

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