thalidomide

Thalidomide vs Pomalidomide - What's the difference?

thalidomide | pomalidomide |


As nouns the difference between thalidomide and pomalidomide

is that thalidomide is (pharmaceutical drug) oxopiperidin-3-yl)-1h-isoindole-1,3(2h)dione c13h10n2[[oxygen|o4 — a drug that was sold during the late 1950s and 1960s as a sleeping aid, and to pregnant women as an antiemetic to combat morning sickness and other symptoms, but was withdrawn after being proven to cause severe birth defects, such as phocomelia; currently used to treat leprosy while pomalidomide is (medicine) a derivative of thalidomide used to treat some myelomas.

Thalidomide vs Lenalidomide - What's the difference?

thalidomide | lenalidomide |


As nouns the difference between thalidomide and lenalidomide

is that thalidomide is (pharmaceutical drug) oxopiperidin-3-yl)-1h-isoindole-1,3(2h)dione c13h10n2[[oxygen|o4 — a drug that was sold during the late 1950s and 1960s as a sleeping aid, and to pregnant women as an antiemetic to combat morning sickness and other symptoms, but was withdrawn after being proven to cause severe birth defects, such as phocomelia; currently used to treat leprosy while lenalidomide is (medicine) a derivative of thalidomide used to treat some myelomas.

Thalidomide vs Phthalidomide - What's the difference?

thalidomide | phthalidomide |


As nouns the difference between thalidomide and phthalidomide

is that thalidomide is (pharmaceutical drug) oxopiperidin-3-yl)-1h-isoindole-1,3(2h)dione c13h10n2[[oxygen|o4 — a drug that was sold during the late 1950s and 1960s as a sleeping aid, and to pregnant women as an antiemetic to combat morning sickness and other symptoms, but was withdrawn after being proven to cause severe birth defects, such as phocomelia; currently used to treat leprosy while phthalidomide is alternative spelling for thalidomide.

Leprosy vs Thalidomide - What's the difference?

leprosy | thalidomide |


As nouns the difference between leprosy and thalidomide

is that leprosy is an infectious disease caused by infection by mycobacterium leprae while thalidomide is (pharmaceutical drug) oxopiperidin-3-yl)-1h-isoindole-1,3(2h)dione c13h10n2[[oxygen|o4 — a drug that was sold during the late 1950s and 1960s as a sleeping aid, and to pregnant women as an antiemetic to combat morning sickness and other symptoms, but was withdrawn after being proven to cause severe birth defects, such as phocomelia; currently used to treat leprosy.

Phocomelia vs Thalidomide - What's the difference?

phocomelia | thalidomide |


As nouns the difference between phocomelia and thalidomide

is that phocomelia is a congenital disorder of the limbs, the affected person being born with abnormally short or missing bones and flipper-like hands or feet while thalidomide is (pharmaceutical drug) oxopiperidin-3-yl)-1h-isoindole-1,3(2h)dione c13h10n2[[oxygen|o4 — a drug that was sold during the late 1950s and 1960s as a sleeping aid, and to pregnant women as an antiemetic to combat morning sickness and other symptoms, but was withdrawn after being proven to cause severe birth defects, such as phocomelia; currently used to treat leprosy.

Withdrawn vs Thalidomide - What's the difference?

withdrawn | thalidomide |


As an adjective withdrawn

is introvert.

As a verb withdrawn

is .

As a noun thalidomide is

(pharmaceutical drug) oxopiperidin-3-yl)-1h-isoindole-1,3(2h)dione c13h10n2[[oxygen|o4 — a drug that was sold during the late 1950s and 1960s as a sleeping aid, and to pregnant women as an antiemetic to combat morning sickness and other symptoms, but was withdrawn after being proven to cause severe birth defects, such as phocomelia; currently used to treat leprosy.

Antiemetic vs Thalidomide - What's the difference?

antiemetic | thalidomide |


As nouns the difference between antiemetic and thalidomide

is that antiemetic is (medicine) a drug that combats nausea and vomiting while thalidomide is (pharmaceutical drug) oxopiperidin-3-yl)-1h-isoindole-1,3(2h)dione c13h10n2[[oxygen|o4 — a drug that was sold during the late 1950s and 1960s as a sleeping aid, and to pregnant women as an antiemetic to combat morning sickness and other symptoms, but was withdrawn after being proven to cause severe birth defects, such as phocomelia; currently used to treat leprosy.

As an adjective antiemetic

is that combats nausea and vomiting.

Drug vs Thalidomide - What's the difference?

drug | thalidomide |


As nouns the difference between drug and thalidomide

is that drug is (pharmacology) a substance used to treat an illness, relieve a symptom, or modify a chemical process in the body for a specific purpose or drug can be (obsolete) a drudge while thalidomide is (pharmaceutical drug) oxopiperidin-3-yl)-1h-isoindole-1,3(2h)dione c13h10n2[[oxygen|o4 — a drug that was sold during the late 1950s and 1960s as a sleeping aid, and to pregnant women as an antiemetic to combat morning sickness and other symptoms, but was withdrawn after being proven to cause severe birth defects, such as phocomelia; currently used to treat leprosy.

As a verb drug

is to administer intoxicating drugs to, generally without the recipient's knowledge or consent or drug can be (drag).

Isoindole vs Thalidomide - What's the difference?

isoindole | thalidomide |


As nouns the difference between isoindole and thalidomide

is that isoindole is (organic compound) a bicyclic heterocycle that is an isomer of indole while thalidomide is (pharmaceutical drug) oxopiperidin-3-yl)-1h-isoindole-1,3(2h)dione c13h10n2[[oxygen|o4 — a drug that was sold during the late 1950s and 1960s as a sleeping aid, and to pregnant women as an antiemetic to combat morning sickness and other symptoms, but was withdrawn after being proven to cause severe birth defects, such as phocomelia; currently used to treat leprosy.

Oxo vs Thalidomide - What's the difference?

oxo | thalidomide |


As nouns the difference between oxo and thalidomide

is that oxo is (chemistry|in combination) a substituent oxygen atom connected to another atom by a double bond while thalidomide is (pharmaceutical drug) oxopiperidin-3-yl)-1h-isoindole-1,3(2h)dione c13h10n2[[oxygen|o4 — a drug that was sold during the late 1950s and 1960s as a sleeping aid, and to pregnant women as an antiemetic to combat morning sickness and other symptoms, but was withdrawn after being proven to cause severe birth defects, such as phocomelia; currently used to treat leprosy.