target

Target vs Sense - What's the difference?

target | sense | Related terms |

Target is a related term of sense.


As a noun target

is a butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile.

As a verb target

is to aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target).

As an adjective sense is

sensible, rational.

Due vs Target - What's the difference?

due | target |


As nouns the difference between due and target

is that due is deserved acknowledgment while target is a butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile.

As an adjective due

is owed or owing.

As an adverb due

is (used with compass directions) directly; exactly.

As a verb target is

to aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target).

Milestone vs Target - What's the difference?

milestone | target |


As nouns the difference between milestone and target

is that milestone is a stone milepost (or by extension in other materials), one of a series of numbered markers placed along a road at regular intervals, typically at the side of the road or in a median while target is a butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile.

As verbs the difference between milestone and target

is that milestone is to place milestones along (a road, etc) while target is to aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target).

Targetting vs Target - What's the difference?

targetting | target |


As verbs the difference between targetting and target

is that targetting is (british spelling) while target is to aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target).

As a noun target is

a butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile.

Target vs Purposeful - What's the difference?

target | purposeful |


As a noun target

is a butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile.

As a verb target

is to aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target).

As an adjective purposeful is

having purpose; intentional.

Target vs Program - What's the difference?

target | program |


As nouns the difference between target and program

is that target is a butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile while program is program, programme.

As a verb target

is to aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target).

Direction vs Target - What's the difference?

direction | target |


As nouns the difference between direction and target

is that direction is the action of directing; pointing (something) or looking towards while target is a butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile.

As a verb target is

to aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target).

Target vs Motivation - What's the difference?

target | motivation |


As nouns the difference between target and motivation

is that target is a butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile while motivation is (label) motivation.

As a verb target

is to aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target).

Target vs Vision - What's the difference?

target | vision |


As nouns the difference between target and vision

is that target is a butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile while vision is ghost.

As a verb target

is to aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target).

Outlook vs Target - What's the difference?

outlook | target |


In lang=en terms the difference between outlook and target

is that outlook is to face down; to outstare while target is to aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target).

As nouns the difference between outlook and target

is that outlook is a place from which something can be viewed while target is a butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile.

As verbs the difference between outlook and target

is that outlook is to face down; to outstare while target is to aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target).

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