tally

Tally vs Busy - What's the difference?

tally | busy |


In lang=en terms the difference between tally and busy

is that tally is to correspond or agree while busy is to rush somebody.

As adjectives the difference between tally and busy

is that tally is (label) used as a mild intensifier: very (almost exclusively used by the upper classes) while busy is crowded with business or activities; having a great deal going on.

As nouns the difference between tally and busy

is that tally is originally, a piece of wood on which notches or scores were cut, as the marks of number; while busy is a police officer.

As verbs the difference between tally and busy

is that tally is to count something while busy is to make somebody busy , to keep busy with, to occupy, to make occupied.

As an interjection tally

is target sighted.

As an adverb tally

is (obsolete) in a tall way; stoutly; with spirit.

Tally vs Aggregate - What's the difference?

tally | aggregate |


As nouns the difference between tally and aggregate

is that tally is originally, a piece of wood on which notches or scores were cut, as the marks of number; while aggregate is .

As an adjective tally

is (label) used as a mild intensifier: very (almost exclusively used by the upper classes).

As an interjection tally

is target sighted.

As a verb tally

is to count something.

As an adverb tally

is (obsolete) in a tall way; stoutly; with spirit.

Gross vs Tally - What's the difference?

gross | tally |


As a proper noun gross

is .

As an adjective tally is

(label) used as a mild intensifier: very (almost exclusively used by the upper classes).

As an interjection tally is

target sighted.

As a noun tally is

originally, a piece of wood on which notches or scores were cut, as the marks of number;.

As a verb tally is

to count something.

As an adverb tally is

(obsolete) in a tall way; stoutly; with spirit.

Hinder vs Tally - What's the difference?

hinder | tally | Related terms |

Hinder is a related term of tally.


In lang=en terms the difference between hinder and tally

is that hinder is to keep back; to delay or impede; to prevent while tally is to correspond or agree.

In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between hinder and tally

is that hinder is (obsolete) to cause harm while tally is (obsolete) in a tall way; stoutly; with spirit.

As verbs the difference between hinder and tally

is that hinder is to make difficult to accomplish; to frustrate, act as obstacle while tally is to count something.

As adjectives the difference between hinder and tally

is that hinder is of or belonging to that part or end which is in the rear or hind, or which follows while tally is (label) used as a mild intensifier: very (almost exclusively used by the upper classes).

As nouns the difference between hinder and tally

is that hinder is (slang|euphemistic) the buttocks while tally is originally, a piece of wood on which notches or scores were cut, as the marks of number;.

As an interjection tally is

target sighted.

As an adverb tally is

(obsolete) in a tall way; stoutly; with spirit.

Statistic vs Tally - What's the difference?

statistic | tally |


As adjectives the difference between statistic and tally

is that statistic is while tally is (label) used as a mild intensifier: very (almost exclusively used by the upper classes).

As nouns the difference between statistic and tally

is that statistic is a single item in a statistical study while tally is originally, a piece of wood on which notches or scores were cut, as the marks of number;.

As an interjection tally is

target sighted.

As a verb tally is

to count something.

As an adverb tally is

(obsolete) in a tall way; stoutly; with spirit.

Tally vs Counting - What's the difference?

tally | counting |


As nouns the difference between tally and counting

is that tally is originally, a piece of wood on which notches or scores were cut, as the marks of number; while counting is a count; the act by which something is counted.

As verbs the difference between tally and counting

is that tally is to count something while counting is .

As an adjective tally

is (label) used as a mild intensifier: very (almost exclusively used by the upper classes).

As an interjection tally

is target sighted.

As an adverb tally

is (obsolete) in a tall way; stoutly; with spirit.

Tally vs Reprove - What's the difference?

tally | reprove | Related terms |

Tally is a related term of reprove.


In lang=en terms the difference between tally and reprove

is that tally is to correspond or agree while reprove is to prevent, avoid, deny or suppress (a feeling, behaviour, action etc).

As verbs the difference between tally and reprove

is that tally is to count something while reprove is to express disapproval.

As an adjective tally

is (label) used as a mild intensifier: very (almost exclusively used by the upper classes).

As an interjection tally

is target sighted.

As a noun tally

is originally, a piece of wood on which notches or scores were cut, as the marks of number;.

As an adverb tally

is (obsolete) in a tall way; stoutly; with spirit.

Stipulate vs Tally - What's the difference?

stipulate | tally | Related terms |

Stipulate is a related term of tally.


As verbs the difference between stipulate and tally

is that stipulate is to require (something) as a condition of a contract or agreement while tally is to count something.

As adjectives the difference between stipulate and tally

is that stipulate is (botany) having stipules; that is, having outgrowths borne on either side of the base of the leafstalk while tally is (label) used as a mild intensifier: very (almost exclusively used by the upper classes).

As an interjection tally is

target sighted.

As a noun tally is

originally, a piece of wood on which notches or scores were cut, as the marks of number;.

As an adverb tally is

(obsolete) in a tall way; stoutly; with spirit.

Promise vs Tally - What's the difference?

promise | tally | Related terms |

Promise is a related term of tally.


In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between promise and tally

is that promise is (obsolete) bestowal or fulfillment of what is promised while tally is (obsolete) in a tall way; stoutly; with spirit.

In lang=en terms the difference between promise and tally

is that promise is to give grounds for expectation, especially of something good while tally is to correspond or agree.

As nouns the difference between promise and tally

is that promise is an oath or affirmation; a vow while tally is originally, a piece of wood on which notches or scores were cut, as the marks of number;.

As verbs the difference between promise and tally

is that promise is to commit to something or action; to make an oath; make a vow while tally is to count something.

As an adjective tally is

(label) used as a mild intensifier: very (almost exclusively used by the upper classes).

As an interjection tally is

target sighted.

As an adverb tally is

(obsolete) in a tall way; stoutly; with spirit.

Curb vs Tally - What's the difference?

curb | tally | Related terms |

Curb is a related term of tally.


In lang=en terms the difference between curb and tally

is that curb is to crouch; to cringe while tally is to correspond or agree.

As nouns the difference between curb and tally

is that curb is (north america) a row of concrete along the edge of a road; a kerb (uk ) while tally is originally, a piece of wood on which notches or scores were cut, as the marks of number;.

As verbs the difference between curb and tally

is that curb is to check, restrain or control while tally is to count something.

As an adjective tally is

(label) used as a mild intensifier: very (almost exclusively used by the upper classes).

As an interjection tally is

target sighted.

As an adverb tally is

(obsolete) in a tall way; stoutly; with spirit.

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