summon

Summon vs Accuse - What's the difference?

summon | accuse |


As verbs the difference between summon and accuse

is that summon is to call people together; to convene while accuse is .

As a noun summon

is call, command, order.

Nod vs Summon - What's the difference?

nod | summon |


As nouns the difference between nod and summon

is that nod is node while summon is call, command, order.

As a verb summon is

to call people together; to convene.

Cast vs Summon - What's the difference?

cast | summon |


As nouns the difference between cast and summon

is that cast is moment or cast can be luck, fortune while summon is call, command, order.

As a verb summon is

to call people together; to convene.

Refer vs Summon - What's the difference?

refer | summon | Related terms |

Refer is a related term of summon.


As verbs the difference between refer and summon

is that refer is to direct the attention of while summon is to call people together; to convene.

As a noun summon is

call, command, order.

Summon vs Squeeze - What's the difference?

summon | squeeze |


As verbs the difference between summon and squeeze

is that summon is to call people together; to convene while squeeze is to apply pressure to from two or more sides at once.

As nouns the difference between summon and squeeze

is that summon is call, command, order while squeeze is a difficult position.

Disallow vs Summon - What's the difference?

disallow | summon |


As verbs the difference between disallow and summon

is that disallow is to refuse to allow while summon is to call people together; to convene.

As a noun summon is

call, command, order.

Sendoff vs Summon - What's the difference?

sendoff | summon |


As nouns the difference between sendoff and summon

is that sendoff is a party for a person (ie a fellow employee) who is leaving; a farewell party while summon is call, command, order.

As a verb summon is

to call people together; to convene.

Rally vs Summon - What's the difference?

rally | summon |


As nouns the difference between rally and summon

is that rally is a demonstration; an event where people gather together to protest for or against a given cause or rally can be good-humoured raillery while summon is call, command, order.

As verbs the difference between rally and summon

is that rally is to collect, and reduce to order, as troops dispersed or thrown into confusion; to gather again; to reunite or rally can be to tease; to chaff good-humouredly while summon is to call people together; to convene.

Adduce vs Summon - What's the difference?

adduce | summon | Related terms |

Adduce is a related term of summon.


As verbs the difference between adduce and summon

is that adduce is to bring forward or offer, as an argument, passage, or consideration which bears on a statement or case; to cite; to allege while summon is to call people together; to convene.

As a noun summon is

call, command, order.

Summon vs Appeal - What's the difference?

summon | appeal | Related terms |

Summon is a related term of appeal.


In legal|lang=en terms the difference between summon and appeal

is that summon is (legal) to order someone to appear in court, especially by issuing a summons while appeal is (legal) (a) an application for the removal of a cause or suit from an inferior to a superior judge or court for re-examination or review (b) the mode of proceeding by which such removal is effected (c) the right of appeal (d) an accusation; a process which formerly might be instituted by one private person against another for some heinous crime demanding punishment for the particular injury suffered, rather than for the offense against the public (e) an accusation of a felon at common law by one of his accomplices, which accomplice was then called an approver.

As verbs the difference between summon and appeal

is that summon is to call people together; to convene while appeal is (obsolete) to accuse (someone of something).

As nouns the difference between summon and appeal

is that summon is call, command, order while appeal is (legal) (a) an application for the removal of a cause or suit from an inferior to a superior judge or court for re-examination or review (b) the mode of proceeding by which such removal is effected (c) the right of appeal (d) an accusation; a process which formerly might be instituted by one private person against another for some heinous crime demanding punishment for the particular injury suffered, rather than for the offense against the public (e) an accusation of a felon at common law by one of his accomplices, which accomplice was then called an approver.

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