subject

What is the difference between clause and subject?

clause | subject |


In context|grammar|lang=en terms the difference between clause and subject

is that clause is (grammar) a verb along with its subject and their modifiers if a clause provides a complete thought on its own, then it is an independent (superordinate) clause; otherwise, it is (subordinate) dependent while subject is (grammar) in a clause: the word or word group (usually a noun phrase) that is dealt with in active clauses with verbs denoting an action, the subject and the actor are usually the same.

As nouns the difference between clause and subject

is that clause is (grammar|informal) a group of two or more words which include a subject and any necessary predicate (the predicate also includes a verb, conjunction, or a preposition) to begin the clause; however, this clause is not considered a sentence for colloquial purposes while subject is (grammar) in a clause: the word or word group (usually a noun phrase) that is dealt with in active clauses with verbs denoting an action, the subject and the actor are usually the same.

As verbs the difference between clause and subject

is that clause is (shipping) to amend (a bill of lading or similar document) while subject is to cause (someone or something) to undergo a particular experience, especially one that is unpleasant or unwanted.

As a adjective subject is

likely to be affected by or experience something.

What is the difference between subject and copula?

subject | copula |


In context|grammar|lang=en terms the difference between subject and copula

is that subject is (grammar) in a clause: the word or word group (usually a noun phrase) that is dealt with in active clauses with verbs denoting an action, the subject and the actor are usually the same while copula is (grammar) a word used to link the subject of a sentence with a predicate (usually a subject complement or an adverbial); it serves to unite (or associate) the subject with the predicate (eg be).

In context|music|lang=en terms the difference between subject and copula

is that subject is (music) the main theme or melody, especially in a fugue while copula is (music) a device that connects two or more keyboards of an organ.

As nouns the difference between subject and copula

is that subject is (grammar) in a clause: the word or word group (usually a noun phrase) that is dealt with in active clauses with verbs denoting an action, the subject and the actor are usually the same while copula is (grammar) a word used to link the subject of a sentence with a predicate (usually a subject complement or an adverbial); it serves to unite (or associate) the subject with the predicate (eg be).

As a adjective subject

is likely to be affected by or experience something.

As a verb subject

is to cause (someone or something) to undergo a particular experience, especially one that is unpleasant or unwanted.

What is the difference between subject and concrete?

subject | concrete |


As adjectives the difference between subject and concrete

is that subject is likely to be affected by or experience something while concrete is particular, perceivable, real.

As nouns the difference between subject and concrete

is that subject is (grammar) in a clause: the word or word group (usually a noun phrase) that is dealt with in active clauses with verbs denoting an action, the subject and the actor are usually the same while concrete is a building material created by mixing portland cement, water, and aggregate including gravel and sand.

As verbs the difference between subject and concrete

is that subject is to cause (someone or something) to undergo a particular experience, especially one that is unpleasant or unwanted while concrete is to cover with or encase in concrete; often constructed as concrete over .

What is the difference between subject and for?

subject | for |


As a adjective subject

is likely to be affected by or experience something.

As a noun subject

is (grammar) in a clause: the word or word group (usually a noun phrase) that is dealt with in active clauses with verbs denoting an action, the subject and the actor are usually the same.

As a verb subject

is to cause (someone or something) to undergo a particular experience, especially one that is unpleasant or unwanted.

As a conjunction for is

because.

As a preposition for is

towards.

What is the difference between subject and copulate?

subject | copulate |


In context|grammar|lang=en terms the difference between subject and copulate

is that subject is (grammar) in a clause: the word or word group (usually a noun phrase) that is dealt with in active clauses with verbs denoting an action, the subject and the actor are usually the same while copulate is (grammar) joining subject and predicate; copulative.

As adjectives the difference between subject and copulate

is that subject is likely to be affected by or experience something while copulate is (obsolete) joined; associated; coupled.

As verbs the difference between subject and copulate

is that subject is to cause (someone or something) to undergo a particular experience, especially one that is unpleasant or unwanted while copulate is to engage in sexual intercourse.

As a noun subject

is (grammar) in a clause: the word or word group (usually a noun phrase) that is dealt with in active clauses with verbs denoting an action, the subject and the actor are usually the same.

What is the difference between subject and you?

subject | you |


As a adjective subject

is likely to be affected by or experience something.

As a noun subject

is (grammar) in a clause: the word or word group (usually a noun phrase) that is dealt with in active clauses with verbs denoting an action, the subject and the actor are usually the same.

As a verb subject

is to cause (someone or something) to undergo a particular experience, especially one that is unpleasant or unwanted.

As a pronoun you is

(object pronoun) the people spoken, or written to, as an object.

As a determiner you is

the individual or group spoken or written to.

What is the difference between subject and know?

subject | know |


As nouns the difference between subject and know

is that subject is (grammar) in a clause: the word or word group (usually a noun phrase) that is dealt with in active clauses with verbs denoting an action, the subject and the actor are usually the same while know is knowledge.

As verbs the difference between subject and know

is that subject is to cause (someone or something) to undergo a particular experience, especially one that is unpleasant or unwanted while know is to be certain or sure about.

As a adjective subject

is likely to be affected by or experience something.

What is the difference between subject and word?

subject | word |


As nouns the difference between subject and word

is that subject is (grammar) in a clause: the word or word group (usually a noun phrase) that is dealt with in active clauses with verbs denoting an action, the subject and the actor are usually the same while word is the fact or action of speaking, as opposed to writing or to action.

As verbs the difference between subject and word

is that subject is to cause (someone or something) to undergo a particular experience, especially one that is unpleasant or unwanted while word is to say or write (something) using particular words.

As a adjective subject

is likely to be affected by or experience something.

As a interjection word is

(slang|aave) truth, to tell or speak the truth; the shortened form of the statement, "my word is my bond," an expression eventually shortened to "word is bond," before it finally got cut to just "word," which is its most commonly used form.

What is the difference between course and subject?

course | subject |


In context|music|lang=en terms the difference between course and subject

is that course is (music) a string on a lute while subject is (music) the main theme or melody, especially in a fugue.

As nouns the difference between course and subject

is that course is a path, sequence, development, or evolution while subject is (grammar) in a clause: the word or word group (usually a noun phrase) that is dealt with in active clauses with verbs denoting an action, the subject and the actor are usually the same.

As verbs the difference between course and subject

is that course is to run or flow (especially of liquids and more particularly blood) while subject is to cause (someone or something) to undergo a particular experience, especially one that is unpleasant or unwanted.

As a adverb course

is (colloquial).

As a adjective subject is

likely to be affected by or experience something.

What is the difference between subject and accidence?

subject | accidence |


In context|grammar|lang=en terms the difference between subject and accidence

is that subject is (grammar) in a clause: the word or word group (usually a noun phrase) that is dealt with in active clauses with verbs denoting an action, the subject and the actor are usually the same while accidence is (grammar) the accidents , of inflections of words; the rudiments of grammar - [[w:john milton|john milton]].

As nouns the difference between subject and accidence

is that subject is (grammar) in a clause: the word or word group (usually a noun phrase) that is dealt with in active clauses with verbs denoting an action, the subject and the actor are usually the same while accidence is (grammar) the accidents , of inflections of words; the rudiments of grammar - [[w:john milton|john milton]].

As a adjective subject

is likely to be affected by or experience something.

As a verb subject

is {{context|transitive|construed with to |lang=en}} to cause (someone or something) to undergo a particular experience, especially one that is unpleasant or unwanted.

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