steen

Steen vs Stfen - What's the difference?

steen | stfen |


As a proper noun steen

is .

As a noun stfen is

.

Steen vs Steem - What's the difference?

steen | steem |


As a proper noun steen

is .

As a noun steem is

(obsolete) a gleam of light; a flame or steem can be (obsolete) value.

As a verb steem is

(obsolete) to value, esteem.

Steen vs Stees - What's the difference?

steen | stees |


As a proper noun steen

is .

As a noun stees is

.

Steen vs Stee - What's the difference?

steen | stee |


As a proper noun steen

is .

As a noun stee is

(obsolete|uk|dialect) a ladder.

Steen vs Stean - What's the difference?

steen | stean |


As a proper noun steen

is .

As a noun stean is

a vessel made of clay or stone; a pot of stone or earth or stean can be a stone.

As a verb stean is

to pelt with stones; throw stones at; stone.

Steen vs Steek - What's the difference?

steen | steek |


As a proper noun steen

is .

As a verb steek is

to stitch (sew with a needle).

As a noun steek is

(scotland) a stitch.

Steen vs Steven - What's the difference?

steen | steven |


As a proper noun steen

is .

As a noun steven is

the voice, now especially when loud or strong or steven can be (obsolete) a time, occasion.

As a verb steven is

(obsolete) to speak; utter; describe; tell of; name or steven can be (obsolete) to call; summon; command; appoint.

Steen vs Sateen - What's the difference?

steen | sateen |


As a proper noun steen

is .

As a noun sateen is

.

Steen vs Steep - What's the difference?

steen | steep |


As a proper noun steen

is .

As an adjective steep is

of a near-vertical gradient; of a slope, surface, curve, etc that proceeds upward at an angle near vertical.

As a verb steep is

(ambitransitive) to soak an item (or to be soaked) in liquid in order to gradually add or remove components to or from the item.

As a noun steep is

a liquid used in a steeping process.

Steen vs Steed - What's the difference?

steen | steed |


As a proper noun steen

is .

As a noun steed is

(archaic|poetic) a stallion, especially in the sense of mount.

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