spide

Slide vs Spide - What's the difference?

slide | spide |


As nouns the difference between slide and spide

is that slide is an item of play equipment that children can climb up and then slide down again while spide is (northern irish english|pejorative) a chav or smick.

As a verb slide

is (ergative) to (cause to) move in continuous contact with a surface.

Taxonomy vs Spide - What's the difference?

taxonomy | spide |


As nouns the difference between taxonomy and spide

is that taxonomy is the science or the technique used to make a classification while spide is (northern irish english|pejorative) a chav or smick.

Spide vs Millie - What's the difference?

spide | millie |

Spide is a see also of millie.


As nouns the difference between spide and millie

is that spide is (northern irish english|pejorative) a chav or smick while millie is (northern ireland, 19th century, pejorative or affectionate) a mill-worker, usually a young, industrybbc newsline broadcast 27th of may 2010.

Chav vs Spide - What's the difference?

chav | spide |


As nouns the difference between chav and spide

is that chav is (uk|pejorative|offensive) a working-class youth, especially one associated with aggression, poor education, and a perceived "common" taste in clothing and lifestyle while spide is (northern irish english|pejorative) a chav or smick.

Spide vs Scanger - What's the difference?

spide | scanger | Synonyms |

Spide is a synonym of scanger.


As nouns the difference between spide and scanger

is that spide is (northern irish english|pejorative) a chav or smick while scanger is (ireland|pejorative) a person who is associated with petty criminality and who is seen as strongly identified with brand names in music, clothing, sport, vehicles, and so forth.

Spide vs Ned - What's the difference?

spide | ned | Synonyms |

Spide is a synonym of ned.


As nouns the difference between spide and ned

is that spide is (northern irish english|pejorative) a chav or smick while ned is (scotland|slang|pejorative|offensive) a person, usually a youth, of low social standing and education, a violent disposition and with a particular style of dress (typically sportswear or burberry), speech and behaviour.

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