sicker

Wikidiffcom vs Sicker - What's the difference?

wikidiffcom | sicker |


As an adjective sicker is

(sick) or sicker can be (obsolete|outside|dialects) certain.

As an adverb sicker is

(obsolete|outside|dialects) certainly.

As a verb sicker is

(mining|uk|dialect) to percolate, trickle, or ooze, as water through a crack.

Ticker vs Sicker - What's the difference?

ticker | sicker |


As a noun ticker

is a measuring or reporting device, particularly one which makes a ticking sound as the measured events occur.

As an adjective sicker is

(sick) or sicker can be (obsolete|outside|dialects) certain.

As an adverb sicker is

(obsolete|outside|dialects) certainly.

As a verb sicker is

(mining|uk|dialect) to percolate, trickle, or ooze, as water through a crack.

Sicker vs Sucker - What's the difference?

sicker | sucker |


As an adjective sicker

is (sick) or sicker can be (obsolete|outside|dialects) certain.

As an adverb sicker

is (obsolete|outside|dialects) certainly.

As a verb sicker

is (mining|uk|dialect) to percolate, trickle, or ooze, as water through a crack.

As a noun sucker is

(us|slang) a native of illinois.

Sicker vs Sicken - What's the difference?

sicker | sicken |


As verbs the difference between sicker and sicken

is that sicker is (mining|uk|dialect) to percolate, trickle, or ooze, as water through a crack while sicken is to make ill.

As an adjective sicker

is (sick) or sicker can be (obsolete|outside|dialects) certain.

As an adverb sicker

is (obsolete|outside|dialects) certainly.

Kicker vs Sicker - What's the difference?

kicker | sicker |


As a noun kicker

is foosball, table soccer.

As an adjective sicker is

(sick) or sicker can be (obsolete|outside|dialects) certain.

As an adverb sicker is

(obsolete|outside|dialects) certainly.

As a verb sicker is

(mining|uk|dialect) to percolate, trickle, or ooze, as water through a crack.

Slicker vs Sicker - What's the difference?

slicker | sicker |


As adjectives the difference between slicker and sicker

is that slicker is (slick) while sicker is (sick) or sicker can be (obsolete|outside|dialects) certain.

As a noun slicker

is one who or that which s.

As an adverb sicker is

(obsolete|outside|dialects) certainly.

As a verb sicker is

(mining|uk|dialect) to percolate, trickle, or ooze, as water through a crack.

Sicker vs Icker - What's the difference?

sicker | icker |


As an adjective sicker

is (sick) or sicker can be (obsolete|outside|dialects) certain.

As an adverb sicker

is (obsolete|outside|dialects) certainly.

As a verb sicker

is (mining|uk|dialect) to percolate, trickle, or ooze, as water through a crack.

As a noun icker is

a head of grain.

Sticker vs Sicker - What's the difference?

sticker | sicker |


As verbs the difference between sticker and sicker

is that sticker is to apply one or more stickers to (something) while sicker is (mining|uk|dialect) to percolate, trickle, or ooze, as water through a crack.

As adjectives the difference between sticker and sicker

is that sticker is (nonstandard|informal) (stick) (stickier) while sicker is (sick) or sicker can be (obsolete|outside|dialects) certain.

As a noun sticker

is something that sticks.

As an adverb sicker is

(obsolete|outside|dialects) certainly.

Sicker vs Smicker - What's the difference?

sicker | smicker |


As adjectives the difference between sicker and smicker

is that sicker is (sick) or sicker can be (obsolete|outside|dialects) certain while smicker is elegant; fine; gay.

As verbs the difference between sicker and smicker

is that sicker is (mining|uk|dialect) to percolate, trickle, or ooze, as water through a crack while smicker is to look amorously or wantonly; smirk.

As an adverb sicker

is (obsolete|outside|dialects) certainly.

Licker vs Sicker - What's the difference?

licker | sicker |


As a noun licker

is someone or something that licks.

As an adjective sicker is

(sick) or sicker can be (obsolete|outside|dialects) certain.

As an adverb sicker is

(obsolete|outside|dialects) certainly.

As a verb sicker is

(mining|uk|dialect) to percolate, trickle, or ooze, as water through a crack.

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